Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jul 2012 18:32 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia just posted its quarterly results - including shipped devices - and it's not looking good. Massive losses, sales dropping, and no growth in Lumia sales in the US. The company is losing money hand-over-fist, and with Windows Phone 8 still months away, the company warns the next quarter will be just as bad.
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RE: WP8
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 19th Jul 2012 18:44 UTC in reply to "WP8"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Yes, but I meant that their current Lumia installed base will effectively be left out in the cold. So, they have to start all over again growing a new installed base for WP8.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: WP8
by vivainio on Thu 19th Jul 2012 19:08 in reply to "RE: WP8"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Installed base is most relevant to developers, and developers can target both WP7 and WP8 by just making a WP7 app. So the installed base won't start from zero.

Developers targeting WP8 exclusively in the beginning will probably be large game studios (because of DirectX and high end hw support), but for them WP7 was suboptimal anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: WP8
by dmrio on Thu 19th Jul 2012 19:30 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
dmrio Member since:
2005-08-26

The problem is: can Nokia really afford this long time bleeding this way?

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[3]: WP8
by Radio on Thu 19th Jul 2012 20:12 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Installed base is most relevant to developers

Then Nokia is totally, utterly dead. Because iOS and Android are growing too, and far, far, far faster. Nokia will own only a few % (maybe as low as 2%) of the market by Christmas.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: WP8
by tylerdurden on Thu 19th Jul 2012 20:22 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

DirectX would have been a great value proposition half a decade ago.

However, it is now irrelevant given the market share of iOS and Android, which means that Microsoft can no longer use their main weapon for effect; their desktop monopoly. Especially given how Windows 8/Metro are a completely unknown quantity.

Nokia and RIM are pretty much dead in the water right now, they will most probably become either targets for acquisition or bankruptcy proceedings. Probably M$ is waiting for Nokia to go even deeper into trouble, so they can buy it for peanuts. Oh, well.

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[3]: WP8
by dsmogor on Fri 20th Jul 2012 06:36 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Not only games. Also the slump of code ported from Android and IOS, the apps that everybody wants on WP.
In general there were reports of WP7 3rd party apps performance problems*. If WinRT allows to fix that easily, Silverlight based apis will be dropped quickly. The 1x mo audience that is diminishing quickly is just not worth additional maintenance effort.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: WP8
by moondevil on Fri 20th Jul 2012 08:51 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Installed base is most relevant to developers, and developers can target both WP7 and WP8 by just making a WP7 app. So the installed base won't start from zero.


This is only relevant if people buy WP handsets, which is not the case in many countries.

Here in Germany I only see WP handsets being available on the shops, but not on the street.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: WP8
by chithanh on Sat 21st Jul 2012 13:41 in reply to "RE[2]: WP8"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

Installed base is most relevant to developers, and developers can target both WP7 and WP8 by just making a WP7 app. So the installed base won't start from zero.

Developers could choose to develop for the old XNA/Silverlight API, or the new WinRT API. Question is, what makes more sense. The Advantage of XNA/Silverlight is that your app will work on WP7.
If you develop for WinRT however, that means you get (among other things) proper multitasking, native code support, and apps that work on the Windows RT tablets. And you will develop using the API that is en vogue at Microsoft, the importance of which should not be underestimated.

Developers targeting WP8 exclusively in the beginning will probably be large game studios (because of DirectX and high end hw support), but for them WP7 was suboptimal anyway.

I expect that almost nobody will target WP8 exclusively. It's either WP7+WP8 or WP8+Windows RT.

Reply Parent Score: 1