Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Jul 2012 21:12 UTC
Windows The moment Microsoft announced it would lock other browsers out of being installed on Windows RT, we all knew regulatory bodies the world over were wringing their hands. Today, this has been confirmed: in the wake of an investigation into Microsoft not complying with the existing antitrust rulings regarding browser choice, the EU has also announced it's investigating Windows 8 x86 and Windows 8 RT (ARM).
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RE[8]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Alfman on Fri 20th Jul 2012 00:55 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

"UEFI doesn't prevent OEMs from installing any other operating system."

Actually, that's precisely what it does when combined with microsoft's requirement that OEM ARM hardware must not boot anything but microsoft's own OS. I don't presume you care about any of this, but you should at least understand it. OEMS should be allowed to sell ARM devices that are advertised as both windows 8 and linux compatible but microsoft doesn't permit it.

"You have a strange definition of 'pressure'. Offering OEMs a financial incentive to install Windows everywhere isn't banned by the consent decree."

Call it what you will, but it is still a valid rebuttal to your assertion that microsoft's desktop monopoly in no way gives them leverage on new ARM devices.

Edited 2012-07-20 00:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by Drumhellar
by tomcat on Fri 20th Jul 2012 04:10 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by Drumhellar"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Actually, that's precisely what it does when combined with microsoft's requirement that OEM ARM hardware must not boot anything but microsoft's own OS.


Read for comprehension. I said "UEFI doesn't prevent OEMs from installing any other operating system". You buy an ARM machine as a packaged unit. Complete with OS and device. You don't reinstall the OS. As other posters have suggested, if you want an ARM device with Linux on it, buy a Linux-based ARM device.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[10]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Alfman on Fri 20th Jul 2012 05:29 in reply to "RE[9]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

tomcat,

"Read for comprehension. I said 'UEFI doesn't prevent OEMs from installing any other operating system'"

I heard you the first time, it's still microsoft ordering OEMs to ban other operating systems on ARM devices that include windows. This is well documented.

For an OEM wanting to ship both windows and linux, they're now forced to ship separate skus, which doubles many of costs that go into a single sku of the product. Consider: Different packaging. The need to stock additional inventory for each model. Creating customer confusion over having multiple physically identical models. Double the risk of unsold inventory if one of the models doesn't sell. Even the retailer needs to allocate additional floor space. These are all major disincentives to offering a separate non-windows version, you can't just write these off as insignificant. An OEM might be happy to serve a 2% linux market share if one product could be sold to both windows and linux buyers. However many OEMS and retailers will understandably baulk at creating a separate product for only 2% of the market.

You might argue that these aren't microsoft's problem, however due to UEFI restrictions, it is their *fault*.

I know you are a microsoft apologist, and you think it is their right to dictate hardware restrictions when OEMs want to bundle windows. Perhaps that is true, but we must stop pretending that it has no influence on choices of OEMs and consumers.

Reply Parent Score: 2