Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jul 2012 18:32 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia just posted its quarterly results - including shipped devices - and it's not looking good. Massive losses, sales dropping, and no growth in Lumia sales in the US. The company is losing money hand-over-fist, and with Windows Phone 8 still months away, the company warns the next quarter will be just as bad.
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RE[2]: Well...
by cdude on Fri 20th Jul 2012 09:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Well..."
cdude
Member since:
2008-09-21

As you write yourself past year Android worked well out for HTC. They lost huge but its not related to Android vs other platform cause they where rather successful with Android before. Its just that competition, Samsung, took over.

It can happen anytime soon, and as we saw with HTC very fast, that Samsung loses and somebody else takes over the Android lead. All have the same Android, so its the final product, execution and the sales-process which make the difference, not the platform.

In contrast to WP7. There its ALSO the platform. WP7 just failed and so even if you do 100% correct and have 100% of the WP7 sales ruling out all other WP7 competition, you lost. There is nothing Nokia can do but lose. Its not there platform. They cannot change that.

With,Android it would all depend on Nokia. They would have the possibility to be better then competition. Be Android number #1 and win unlike be WP7 number #1 and lose. That is the difference between success and failure, between being able to win and doomed to fail, between shaping your future yourself or depend on somebody else to do it for you. Nokia cannot modiy WP7, they cannot make the upgrade-path from WP7 to WP8 Lumia work, they cannot do anything. With Android they could. Such kind of one-way dependencies where you build up the health of your company on the good will of somebody else are never a good idea. We see why.

Nokia is fighting the wrong war. They fight for ecosystem market share rather then for Nokia market share. They cannot win that war but only lose cause even when WP wins Samsung and HTC are still there but on WP rather then Android (in fact Samsung and HTC sell WP7 devices cause they are not so stupid to fight the wrong war).

Edited 2012-07-20 09:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Well...
by B. Janssen on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 13:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Well..."
B. Janssen Member since:
2006-10-11

Nokia is fighting the wrong war. They fight for ecosystem market share rather then for Nokia market share. They cannot win that war but only lose cause even when WP wins Samsung and HTC are still there but on WP rather then Android (in fact Samsung and HTC sell WP7 devices cause they are not so stupid to fight the wrong war).


That's an astute observation, but it also means that Nokia could have only escaped the relegation to mere handset maker by staying on a self-owned platform. If Nokia went with Android they would be an Android one-trick-pony instead of a WP one and fight for the Android platform. To escape this lockdown they would have to offer both, Android and WP handsets. This would mean that Nokia becomes something like another Samsung. Now, that doesn't look too bad at first glance, but 1. that's not what Nokia thinks it is and 2. that's not what Nokia can be.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Well...
by chithanh on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 15:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Well..."
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

That's an astute observation, but it also means that Nokia could have only escaped the relegation to mere handset maker by staying on a self-owned platform. If Nokia went with Android they would be an Android one-trick-pony instead of a WP one and fight for the Android platform. To escape this lockdown they would have to offer both, Android and WP handsets. This would mean that Nokia becomes something like another Samsung. Now, that doesn't look too bad at first glance, but 1. that's not what Nokia thinks it is and 2. that's not what Nokia can be.

I don't think that Nokia would have been forced to do that.

At the time when Elop took over, Nokia was bigger than Samsung. And Samsung offers Android, Bada, WP7 and soon Tizen smartphones.

So there is no reason why Nokia couldn't offer Android, MeeGo, Symbian and WP7. The addition of their navigation and cloud services would have been enough to distinguish them from the crowd. They could even offer MeeGo and Android on the same hardware thanks to the Linux kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 0