Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 21st Jul 2012 23:06 UTC
In the News Okay, so this is entirely new to me. Sparrow is was an email client for Mac OS X and iOS (and Windows), which brought a decent Gmail experience to these platforms - as opposed to Apple's own not-so-good Gmail support and Google's Gmail iOS application which, well, is just a webpage. Google has now acquired Sparrow, and basically all hell has broken loose, to the point of Rian van der Merwe writing that 'we' lost "faith in a philosophy that we thought was a sustainable way to ensure a healthy future for independent software development, where most innovation happens".
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Sparrow complete
by Athlander on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 00:41 UTC
Athlander
Member since:
2008-03-10

I read an article dated March 14th about Sparrow on The Verge. According to Dominique Leca, one of the people behind it, "The problem with Sparrow is that I'm happy with what we've done." The article goes on to say that the next step for Sparrow is optimization and seeing what aspects of the app people actually use — seeing where people click and how the UI can be even further optimized.

So Sparrow probably wasn't going to get many more features anyway. I can see why people may be upset if they had been paying for a beta because they believed in a project and wanted to support the developers but in this case they have paid for a finished product that will continue to receive bug fixes and security patches for at least the near future.

I wonder if the reaction would have been the same if Apple had bought Sparrow. This seems more of an issue with Google than anything else.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Sparrow complete
by jptros on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 00:59 in reply to "Sparrow complete"
jptros Member since:
2005-08-26

I think people are upset they never received push notifications in the iOS version which most people probably purchased in support and anticipation of that feature. In addition, who wants to use a piece of software for your day to day business that you know has no future? Email clients aren't a hobby OS or something you really play with for nostalgic reasons. In addition they say there will be bug fixes and what not, but hey, they said they were working hard on getting push notifications numerous times and look at how that has turned out. Personally, I think the developers saw a big pay day and new offices on the horizon and packed up shop and that is OK. It's their right, but that doesn't mean doing so didn't piss a few folks off.

Typo correction.

Edited 2012-07-22 01:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Sparrow complete
by OSNevvs on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 06:38 in reply to "Sparrow complete"
OSNevvs Member since:
2009-08-20

And I disagree with this:

The one, only, and true way to ensure this doesn't happen is to use open source software


Wrong. How many open-source projects get abandonned and no one retrieves them to further develop them or apply security patches? Many, for instance v-webmail. If you aren't a developer (my case), you're left in the dark.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sparrow complete
by chithanh on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 20:51 in reply to "RE: Sparrow complete"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

Wrong. How many open-source projects get abandonned and no one retrieves them to further develop them or apply security patches? Many, for instance v-webmail. If you aren't a developer (my case), you're left in the dark.

Then nobody is interested enough in the application to continue developing (or hiring someone to do it). So it gets abandoned. If on the other hand there is sufficient community interest, the development will continue.

With proprietary software nobody else can continue development, regardless of his skills and motivation.

Reply Parent Score: 4