Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 17:05 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces Mike Elgan at Cult of Mac: "It must surely be a sign of the impending apocalypse that Microsoft's operating systems have 'more taste' than Apple's. I'm referring, of course, to Apple's inexplicable use of skeuomorphic design in iOS and OS X apps, and contrasting that with Microsoft's stark avoidance of such cheesy gimmickry in the Windows 8 and Windows Phone user interfaces. A skeuomorphic design in software is one that 'decorates' the interface with fake reality - say, analog knobs or torn paper. The problem is worse than it sounds." Won't come as a surprise to anyone that I wholeheartedly agree with this one. iOS and Mac OS X are ruined by an incredibly high Microsoft BOB factor. I have no idea how - or if - Apple will address this, or if the current downward spiral is going to continue.
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RE[2]: Hm
by henderson101 on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 22:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Hm"
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

That said, I think Apple goes too far with, for example, GarageBand with its wasted pixels on either side to represent functionless wooden cabinet panels.


I need to stop you there. GarageBand is a REALLY, REALLY poor example to use. Anyone who has used ant kind of music creation software can tell you that this is the absolute norm. Here are some key players who skeuomorph like a Mofo:

Native Instruments - Guitar Rig, Studio Drummer, pretty much all of their products and plug ins (including ones that work in GarageBand)

IK Multimedia's AmpliTube.

Peavey ReValver

Toontrack EZ Drummer

Addictive Drummer

Any of the 100's of free or low cost VST or AudioUnit plug-ins for PC or Mac.

I have no idea why they feel they need to look like real hardware. It is actually harder to use them in many respects. But they do.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Hm
by redshift on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 22:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Hm"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

Anyone who has used ant kind of music creation software can tell you that this is the absolute norm. Here are some key players who skeuomorph like a Mofo:....

...I have no idea why they feel they need to look like real hardware. It is actually harder to use them in many respects. But they do.


Sometimes I hate that you cant vote on posts after you have responded to an article. I really want to give you a +1 for this. It is very true.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Hm
by Morgan on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 22:58 in reply to "RE[2]: Hm"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Did you read the paragraph above the one you quoted, where I said that skeuomorphism can actually serve a purpose in audio editing software? My comment about GarageBand specifically called out the useless "wooden" left and right borders. The program overall is one of my favorites, especially on the iPad.

Personally I find the realistic look of the knobs and sliders in such programs easier to understand, coming from a background in analog audio editing. I was making a distinction between useless, eye candy skeuomorphism and functional, useful implementations.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Hm
by henderson101 on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 10:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Hm"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

GarageBand specifically called out the useless "wooden" left and right borders.


Why does Guitar Rig need to implement a rack for my emulated Amps? Why does EZ Drummer need to show me an on screen kit that is impossible to play without a multitouch screen? (and they didn't exist for the general public the first time I ever used EZ Drummer.)

I'll admit I skimmed your original post, apologies. But if one starts down the road of realism, where does one stop?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Hm
by redshift on Wed 25th Jul 2012 02:57 in reply to "RE[3]: Hm"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

Did you read the paragraph above the one you quoted, where I said that skeuomorphism can actually serve a purpose in audio editing software?.


Yes... I have seen a few cases where it helped. I forget what the software was, but it basically represented analog plugs and patch cables between virtual amps and virtual analog sound fx equipment. For people who understood the equipment it emulated it was extremely east for them to wire them up on the computer screen to get the desired effect.

Perhaps it grates on me more when they skeumorphize something that has become more familiar on the computer than the nearly forgotten analog they emulate.

Reply Parent Score: 1