Linked by paolone on Fri 20th Jul 2012 19:21 UTC
Amiga & AROS The AROS distribution Icaros Desktop has made its next step towards compatibility with legacy Amiga workbench applications, including an entire AROS enviroment compiled for the classic Amiga platform, which is almost binary compatible with the original Amiga OS 3.1 (and its extensions). When the user needs an old program, he or she only has to fire up the AROS M68K environment and run the application. The Amiga virtual machine can optionally be set to run at startup like a system service.
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RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?
by paolone on Mon 23rd Jul 2012 08:08 UTC in reply to "RE: AMOS Pro is included?"
paolone
Member since:
2007-09-24

i'm just trying to understand what the appeal is here. I mean I get maybe firing up a VM once in a while just to relive memories, but what is the point of completely rebuilding a long dead OS like this?


AmigaOS made some real magic when hardware resources were scarce. At the times of first Pentium and Athlon processors I often asked myself how a low-footprint OS like AmigaOS would have performed on such CPUs, since it performed so well on a <10 MHz processor. I embraced the AROS project short after its birth because I felt it could give me an answer. And that's my motivation.

I perfectly know the world has changed so much in the meanwhile. We've now multi core processors, multi CPU motherboards, hybrid architectures like APUs and all the power a GPU can give, not only with graphics. So now my new curiosity is about how Amiga can deal with all this, and once again AROS can give me the answers (although current stable branch supports just 1 CPU and has no OpenCL support yet, multicore stuff is in the works).

Moreover, I grew up with the Amiga in the first 90s and loved its OS: there are many little habits I couldn't simply find in "mainstream OSes", so if I can have a way to continue with them, performing about the same tasks I can do with other alternatives, why shouldn't I?

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RE[3]: AMOS Pro is included?
by zima on Fri 27th Jul 2012 23:59 in reply to "RE[2]: AMOS Pro is included?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

AmigaOS made some real magic when hardware resources were scarce. At the times of first Pentium and Athlon processors I often asked myself how a low-footprint OS like AmigaOS would have performed on such CPUs, since it performed so well on a <10 MHz processor.

There's a "problem" (not really, just from an elegance point of view) when that means bringing over things which made it nice back then, which very much made sense, but just don't fit modern times...
I'm guessing that proper memory protection will come right around the time of ditching silicon for something else, in chips.

Overall, the answer to "how would have performed" is perhaps that it really doesn't, that is sort of outside context - it's not any more an Amiga (a limited but very tightly coupled hardware and software; with some sacrifices in that elegance and purist correctness in the latter, for the sake of efficiency)


And most other OS can be also quite small, when not looking at the size of whole distribution ( http://www.osnews.com/permalink?527819 ).

Edited 2012-07-28 00:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2