Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 22nd Jul 2012 17:05 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces Mike Elgan at Cult of Mac: "It must surely be a sign of the impending apocalypse that Microsoft's operating systems have 'more taste' than Apple's. I'm referring, of course, to Apple's inexplicable use of skeuomorphic design in iOS and OS X apps, and contrasting that with Microsoft's stark avoidance of such cheesy gimmickry in the Windows 8 and Windows Phone user interfaces. A skeuomorphic design in software is one that 'decorates' the interface with fake reality - say, analog knobs or torn paper. The problem is worse than it sounds." Won't come as a surprise to anyone that I wholeheartedly agree with this one. iOS and Mac OS X are ruined by an incredibly high Microsoft BOB factor. I have no idea how - or if - Apple will address this, or if the current downward spiral is going to continue.
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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

The bigger issue is that we're moving away again from the document-centric ideal, back to an application-centric world. In the latter, the application is the star, and as such, gets more attention than what actually matters (the document or content).

In a document-centric world, applications must get out of your way and hence they ought to be as consistent and unobtrusive as possible - with the ultimate goal being that applications become loose collections of components, with document calling individual components instead of entire applications.

I always thought this was what we were working towards, but somewhere we did a 180 and regressed back to the MS-DOS days. What a shame. I don't give a rat's ass about applications or their developers - I care about my shit.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

The bigger issue is that we're moving away again from the document-centric ideal, back to an application-centric world...

In a document-centric world, applications must get out of your way and hence they ought to be as consistent and unobtrusive as possible...with document calling individual components instead of entire applications.


I swear, there are times when I wonder if you and I are long lost brothers or something; I feel like I'm reading my own quotes up there. I've been pushing for a return to document/workflow-centric paradigms for many years now, but I think you're right: We are losing that war.

Reply Parent Score: 2

siraf72 Member since:
2006-02-22

Do you mean Document-centric in an OpenDoc type approach?

For me, I find documents becoming less and less relevant as the Data they contain (including presentation of the data) tends to exist in various places. I might have a .doc a pdf and a copy on google docs of the same document. Only the actual data within it matters. Increasingly, applications pass data to each other via APIs and keep local (often hidden documents).

What difference does it make if where the focus lies? If applications are too cumbersome they will be replaced by less cumbersome ones.

For me, I think looking for a one size fits all document-centric approach sounds nice but also like an impossible ideal.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

What difference does it make if where the focus lies?


A huge one. Now, if I want to edit a bit of text in a word document, I have to load up ALL of Word - even if the doc only has text in it, it still loads up everything else, unrelated to text editing.

In a proper document-centric approach, you'd load up the doc, and when you start editing text, it automatically loads the appropriate text editing engine (preferably all standardised), and ONLY that. If you double click on a picture in the doc, the picture editing component is loaded.

An ideal, for sure, but something I always thought we were working towards.

Reply Parent Score: 1

redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

The bigger issue is that we're moving away again from the document-centric ideal, back to an application-centric world. In the latter, the application is the star, and as such, gets more attention than what actually matters (the document or content).


It is one of the reasons I find iOS difficult for content creation. The creative work I do on the desktop is made much harder for me when I can't freely move my content between apps as I can in the desktop world. Each app is its own walled garden for content due to a lack of filesystem management and interoperability.

Reply Parent Score: 1