Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Jul 2012 22:18 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes The article I'm about to link to, by Oliver Reichenstein, is pretty terrible, but it's a good way for me to bring up something I've been meaning to talk about. First, the article: "Apple has been working on its file system and with iOS it had almost killed the concept of folders - before reintroducing them with a peculiar restriction: only one level! With Mountain Lion it brings its one folder level logic to OSX. What could be the reason for such a restrictive measure?" So, where does this crusade against directory structures (not file systems, as the article aggravatingly keeps stating) come from?
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RE[2]: BeOS
by PlunderBunny on Wed 25th Jul 2012 23:58 UTC in reply to "RE: BeOS"
PlunderBunny
Member since:
2009-02-19

You do realise that this one-level directory restriction applies only to documents saved in iCloud, don't you? Saving files on your Mac hard disk continues to work the way it always has.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: BeOS
by phoudoin on Thu 26th Jul 2012 00:08 in reply to "RE[2]: BeOS"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

I do.

I also realized that's it's done voluntary to prepare people to drop local storage in favor of cloud one, and indeed losing multiple level hierarchy is one feature that needs to be less visible to end-user to ease this move.
Last but not least, I realized the argument that it's better that way is uncomplete: it's better for cloud companies in term of profit and storage complexity management, but it's a feature regression for end-users.

Not that I care that much: I don't plan to use an Apple technology anytime soon, and if I use cloud storage one day, it will be as crash plan storage, with signed encrypted backup files.
For the share everywhere everytime everyone, OwnCloud or similar is fine enough, thank you.

Reply Parent Score: 8