Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Jul 2012 22:18 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes The article I'm about to link to, by Oliver Reichenstein, is pretty terrible, but it's a good way for me to bring up something I've been meaning to talk about. First, the article: "Apple has been working on its file system and with iOS it had almost killed the concept of folders - before reintroducing them with a peculiar restriction: only one level! With Mountain Lion it brings its one folder level logic to OSX. What could be the reason for such a restrictive measure?" So, where does this crusade against directory structures (not file systems, as the article aggravatingly keeps stating) come from?
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RE: To the point
by OSNevvs on Thu 26th Jul 2012 06:49 UTC in reply to "To the point"
OSNevvs
Member since:
2009-08-20

And what about opening a directory with 15 MP3 files (an album)? Should I remember all tune file names? And search for them individually to add them to my playlist? How convenient is that? ;)

Always reinventing the wheel. Always inventing non-existent problems. Always trying to look "inovative". It reminds those who always try to "reinvent" the email concept. I just wish the Linux folks (and MS) don't jump into this bandwagon like blind sheeps.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: To the point
by aliquis on Thu 26th Jul 2012 07:36 in reply to "RE: To the point"
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

You of course search stored data about your data.

In this case things like ID3 tags.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: To the point
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 27th Jul 2012 02:42 in reply to "RE[2]: To the point"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

No, that's terrible too. The correct counter point, is that you shouldn't be looking at any folder for music. The music app should already know about all of your media files and organize them into albums accessible by pictures.

Reply Parent Score: 2