Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th Jul 2012 12:41 UTC
Gnome Honest question. Do you think the GNOME project is as healthy today as it was, say, 4 years ago? Benjamin Otte explains that no, it isn't. GNOME lacks developers, goals, mindshare and users. The situation as he describes it, is a lot more dire than I personally thought.
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RE: Shame, I like gnome3
by snowbender on Fri 27th Jul 2012 21:20 UTC in reply to "Shame, I like gnome3"
snowbender
Member since:
2006-05-04

I've unleashed complete newbies into gnome 3 gui and they didn't skip a beat. gnome 2 gave the same users some pause and took them a while to figure things out.


This hints that gnome 3 is written for complete newbies?

I use linux since 1997. As a window manager in the beginning I used mainly WindowMaker and XFCE3. Then I started using Garnome, which if I remember it right, was a script to build Gnome 2 from trunk. And in any case, I've used Gnome 2 for a very long time.

Since a couple of years, I feel left behind as a faithful linux user. Everything in the linux world lately seems to be targetted at Windows users. Every piece of software seems to be targetted at new inexperienced users. The whole Gnome 3 seems to be targetted at new inexperienced users. Every single piece of software seems to be so dumbed down.

In my eyes, the Gnome developers are targetting a group of people that currently do not, and most likely will not use Gnome. Let me give you a clue: most of those people currently use Windows or OSX and are perfectly happy with those systems. Why would they change? Why would you try to make them change?

The Gnome developers seem to be focussed so much on attracting new users, that they completely ignored the existing user base of experienced linux power users...

Either way.. I switched to XFCE4 in the mean time... which I'm not exactly very happy with, but it works.

Some other people mentioned that some desktop environments have been using methods and idioms that are over 20 years old and that those never changed and that there should be more evolution in the software. Let me tell you this... if those methods and idioms have been in use over the whole world for over 20 years and people are generally happy with those idioms, then it probably means that there must be something good about them.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Shame, I like gnome3
by bouhko on Fri 27th Jul 2012 22:13 in reply to "RE: Shame, I like gnome3"
bouhko Member since:
2010-06-24

I think you raise a very valid point. Gnome 3 is targeted towards non-technical users. That's one of the reason why they have close to zero customization and stuff.

The problem is that once you get out of the Gnome reality distortion field, the people who use GNU/Linux on the desktop are technical people. Linux desktop is mostly very popular amongst engineers and scientists. Those are mostly people who just want a UI that works and don't care much about all the fancy stuff.
Now, it's good to try to make an interface that's more welcoming to new users, but they should do that without alienating their existing userbase.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Shame, I like gnome3
by znby on Sat 28th Jul 2012 11:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Shame, I like gnome3"
znby Member since:
2012-02-03

Maybe it has been designed with non technical users in mind, but it's perfectly usable by professionals with the right customizations.

Sure, they could have made it much easier to tinker with out-of-the-box by including more options and tools, but I personally find that I need to tinker with any desktop before it behaves like I want it to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, I didn't exactly mean that it was directed towards newbies. But it doesn't surprise me that they would have a better time picking it up and accepting it than those that were used to gnome 2.

Its different. I'm not saying that the complaints aren't valid, because they kind of are. It sucks when someone takes something you have configured perfectly for your usage and messes it all up. Having said that, there is a certain challenge in learning new ways of doing things that is exciting. Obviously those complaining don't relish that challenge. Which is ironic, because I had thought that challenge was what drove many people to Linux in the first place.

I do believe some of my friends mocked me as a newbie because I used gnome/kde instead of all command line.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Shame, I like gnome3
by snowbender on Mon 30th Jul 2012 19:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Shame, I like gnome3"
snowbender Member since:
2006-05-04

Having said that, there is a certain challenge in learning new ways of doing things that is exciting. Obviously those complaining don't relish that challenge. Which is ironic, because I had thought that challenge was what drove many people to Linux in the first place.


I get what you mean, but my sarcastic reply is: it certainly is challenging to use gconf-editor and go search for the option that was removed and that might or might not be available and configurable through gconf-editor...

But seriously, I do get what you mean... however, I think that the feeling is more like that, yes, it is a challenge to configure everything, but if you persist, you will be able to configure everything exactly the way you want it. That "promise" that in the end you are rewarded with an environment exactly the way you want it, is no longer true in my opinion.

That, and the fact that in recent years I have less free time, and don't wanna invest a lot of time to reconfigure my desktop environment every time someone thinks it needs to be "improved".

I do believe some of my friends mocked me as a newbie because I used gnome/kde instead of all command line.


Well.. do not underestimate the power of the commandline. But on the other hand it would be stupid to not also use the power of a graphical shell.

Reply Parent Score: 3