Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 30th Jul 2012 19:38 UTC, submitted by tupp
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless It might be a cliche, but sometimes, a picture says more than a thousand words. Over the years, I've often talked about how the technology world is iterative, about how products are virtually always built upon that which came before, about how almost always, multiple people independently arrive at the same products since they work within the same constraints of the current state of technology. This elementary aspect of the technology world, which some would rather forget, has been illustrated very, very well in one of Samsung's legal filings against Apple.
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Sony eh. Very interesting read.
by tanishaj on Mon 30th Jul 2012 20:16 UTC
tanishaj
Member since:
2010-12-22

Of course many of the iPhone's great features would have been introduced without Apple. I did not realize how many of them had been though.

Kudos to Apple for putting them all in one product. As Jobs himself once bragged, great artists steal.

I would not have guessed it was Sony though that so heavily influenced the industrial design. I do not associate Sony electronics with a great sense of style. Perhaps that is unfair though.

Reply Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

You must be young. Sony was the king of elegant design in consumer electronics, before the rise of the ipod. Growing up, if you didn't have a Sony walkman/discman/minidisc, you were roundly mocked.

Sony always worked better from day one, looked better, and lasted longer than anything else.

I think they would be a much better consumer electronics company today, if they had not entered the record and movie business. That started their crippling of products to proprietary drm laden formats.

Reply Parent Score: 27

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Yeah, DRM kills the brain of those who promote it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

You must be young. Sony was the king of elegant design in consumer electronics, before the rise of the ipod. Growing up, if you didn't have a Sony walkman/discman/minidisc, you were roundly mocked.

Sony always worked better from day one, looked better, and lasted longer than anything else.


DING DING DING DING! We have a winner.

I think they would be a much better consumer electronics company today, if they had not entered the record and movie business. That started their crippling of products to proprietary drm laden formats.


^^Bonus points^^

This hit the nail square on the head. Once Sony got into the content business their fate was sealed. The proprietary formats were relentless and now Sony and the RIAA are so joined at the hip that I no longer purchase or recommend their products to anyone.

Reply Parent Score: 11

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

As Jobs himself once bragged, great artists steal.


It seems what they really mean is "great artists, as long as the artist is Apple, steal. If not then they are thieving bastards who should be drawn and quartered."

Edited 2012-07-31 03:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 12

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Steve Jobs wasn't the original author of the quote. I always found it ironic; that he took somebody else's quote to complain against plagiarism.

Edited 2012-07-31 23:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

pancete Member since:
2012-07-31

As I'm pretty fed up with the Jobsian religion and its tireless acolytes, I've just registered to vent my rage. I would like to make a few points (I thought they were platitudes, but it seems I was wrong):
1. Steve Jobs was not an artist of any kind; no Apple product is a work of art by any "artistic" standards (more of a sexual fetish or a religious totem).
2. "Good artists copy, great artists steal" is not an original quote by Jobs, but by Pablo Picasso; similarly T.S. Eliot had already remarked that "Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal" (perhaps Picasso stole the quote, by he was a great artist after all).
3. Apart from quotations, Jobs and Apple stole many of their "new" concepts and designs.
4. If you aren't a great artist -- not even a good artist or an immature one (see point 1) -- and you steal nevertheless (see points 2 & 3) then you are a thief. (Mind you, this does not mean that other companies are not thieves too.)

Reply Parent Score: 6

vruz Member since:
2012-08-03

+1 on all counts.

additionally, in **1870** this little genius said:

"Plagiarism is necessary. Progress implies it. It holds tight an author’s phrase, uses his expressions, eliminates a false idea, and replaces it with just the right idea."

– Isidore Ducasse, Comte de Lautréamont, Poésies II

Reply Parent Score: 1

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Steve admired Sony and his turtle neck outfit has a direct link with Sony:

http://www.geekosystem.com/why-steve-jobs-wore-turtlenecks/

Reply Parent Score: 4

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I wouldn't wanna call Steve a hack, I guess the only thing he is good at is having taste/vision and saying: no

With vision I mean, like the people at Xerox didn't know what they really had when they let Apple see and use it.

That also is a talent, maybe his only talent.

Reply Parent Score: 2

franksands Member since:
2009-08-18

Great artists may steal, but cannot sue everybody later saying it was his idea, since he admittedly stole it in the first place.
How times have changed, huh?

Reply Parent Score: 2