Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 01:48 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
KDE "KDE is delighted to announce its latest set of releases, providing major updates to KDE Plasma Workspaces, KDE Applications, and the KDE Platform. Version 4.9 provides many new features, along with improved stability and performance."
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RE: Oh, my...
by Loreia on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 07:55 UTC in reply to "Oh, my..."
Loreia
Member since:
2012-01-17

You are hardly the only person that has a problem with this. I am just reading Ars technica article about 4.9, and about one half of comments on first page are about "how ugly KDE is".

Some are really harsh:

Oh my god, can we get HALF A DESIGNER here?


It's amazing how, release after release after release, KDE continues to look like it was slapped together in about five minutes.


Good grief, that's ugly. Even by open source standards, that's ugly.


The defaults need to be sane and not look like complete ass. Customization is great and all, but users shouldn't need to spend time changing themes, rearranging window decorations, removing useless buttons, etc just to get to something that doesn't make one's eyes bleed.


And so on ...
It is strange that KDE puts so much effort in creating great technology, but for the most part ignores visual appeal. And distributions mostly just ship default build. Open Suse is the most obvious exception, but sadly Open Suse doesn't work well on my laptop.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Oh, my...
by ndrw on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 09:06 in reply to "RE: Oh, my..."
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

To me, it looks as if KDE developers were paralyzed with fear of changing anything in default settings and look&feel. They just keep piling new stuff on top of old one, without taking a step back to look at the result. Which is really strange, considering that they could just get together for an afternoon and with a minimum effort make KDE twice as good as it is now.

There are three problems with pushing the design process to the users:
- It makes the desktop less attractive, despite all the work that went into it, many users won't even try it.
- Design should take place before the implementation, not after it.
- Most users can't design a desktop - they are perfectly able to judge it (which is what Gnome guys forget) but they do not necessarily know *how to make* a good desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Oh, my...
by Loreia on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 09:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Oh, my..."
Loreia Member since:
2012-01-17

- Most users can't design a desktop - they are perfectly able to judge it (which is what Gnome guys forget) but they do not necessarily know *how to make* a good desktop.



The best description / critique of KDE's way (of organizing "Look and feel" options) I've ever read. !!

Edited 2012-08-02 10:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Oh, my...
by lemur2 on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 10:23 in reply to "RE[2]: Oh, my..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

To me, it looks as if KDE developers were paralyzed with fear of changing anything in default settings and look&feel. They just keep piling new stuff on top of old one, without taking a step back to look at the result. Which is really strange, considering that they could just get together for an afternoon and with a minimum effort make KDE twice as good as it is now.

There are three problems with pushing the design process to the users:
- It makes the desktop less attractive, despite all the work that went into it, many users won't even try it.
- Design should take place before the implementation, not after it.
- Most users can't design a desktop - they are perfectly able to judge it (which is what Gnome guys forget) but they do not necessarily know *how to make* a good desktop.


The KDE developers know how to make a good desktop, and that is what they do.

It is actually up to the distributions to make it look good.

Reply Parent Score: -1

v RE[2]: Oh, my...
by lemur2 on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 10:22 in reply to "RE: Oh, my..."
RE[3]: Oh, my...
by saynte on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 10:50 in reply to "RE[2]: Oh, my..."
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

Ugh, any evidence to support this multi-account anti-KDE theory?

Or is just because Ars has a section called "One Microsoft Way" (which they don't have anymore, btw).

Peter Bright is the MS-guy there, but they also have Ryan Paul on the open-source side; they *do* have a section just for Apple though.

As someone who reads Ars fairly regularly, I haven't seen what you're describing.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Oh, my...
by Loreia on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 12:50 in reply to "RE[2]: Oh, my..."
Loreia Member since:
2012-01-17

Ars Technica is a Microsoft shop. They even have a section called "One Microsoft Way".

The Ars Technica fanbois are simply trying to disparage KDE via their multiple accounts, posting disparaging nonsense then agreeing with themselves.

Pay them no heed. Don't feed the trolls.


I am not so worried about *who* is criticizing, I am more interested in *what* they have to say. And the fact that many people find default KDE "ugly" or "hurting eyes" tells you a lot.

The thing is, I agree with most of them. If I ignore childish insults, I can agree that default KDE look is "ugly". In fact I find it the least visually appealing DE out there. And this is coming from someone who works in 10 years old Solaris CDE on daily basis.

But what I find the most annoying part is that KDE makes it so hard to change the look and feel of KDE desktop. They have all these "regional themes" (one for each element of desktop) that you need to manually select and download from kde-look.org. Why isn't there a central way to change KDE from "ugly" to "stunningly beautiful" with a single mouse click? In this way talented artist could create and share "real themes" (the kind that changes everything on a screen)

Current way is so tiresome that even distributions don't bother, they just ship default one, at most they change wallpaper.

To be perfectly honest, some applications (like Dolphin and Kate) leave better initial impression on me when I install them on MS Windows.

I find it sad that KDE guys work so hard to create this great DE, and then they "shoot themselves in the foot" by ignoring visual aesthetics aspect of it. Since most distributions don't care about KDE more that compiling and shipping default version, maybe KDE team should pay some attention to the problem.

Reply Parent Score: 3