Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Aug 2012 22:45 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Hardware, Embedded Systems "It is 30 years since the Commodore 64 went on sale to the public. The machine was hugely successful for its time, helping to encourage personal computing, popularise video games and pioneer homemade computer-created music. [...] BBC News invited Commodore enthusiast Mat Allen to show schoolchildren his carefully preserved computer, at a primary school and secondary school in London."
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Comment by KLU9
by KLU9 on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 11:03 UTC
KLU9
Member since:
2006-12-06

The resemblances between the retro geek in the video and ... er... me... is just too frightening to contemplate.

(although of course I was a BBC Micro user, not a C64 fan)

Edited 2012-08-02 11:04 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by KLU9
by MOS6510 on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 12:11 in reply to "Comment by KLU9"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

A friend of mine had an Acorn Electron. He later got a C64, just like all of us.

He swapped the Electron with my brother for a Power Cartridge (C64 util/fast loader cart). Somehow I got my hands on it and a few years ago I gave it back to the original owner.

Although a bit limited compared to the BBC (although expandable) it was still a very nice machine. Very sturdy and a great BASIC. IIRC you could embed Assembler routines in BASIC.

When used to a full screen editor like the C64 it was a bit strange to edit BASIC on an Acorn though. You could move the cursor around, but you couldn't edit. Instead you'd move it somewhere and you could copy text to the line you were really on.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by KLU9
by darknexus on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 13:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by KLU9"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

When used to a full screen editor like the C64 it was a bit strange to edit BASIC on an Acorn though. You could move the cursor around, but you couldn't edit. Instead you'd move it somewhere and you could copy text to the line you were really on.


Sounds like the Apple II's primitive edit mode when you were running the Applesoft Basic interpreter, at least in DOS 3.3 which used the version of Basic your machine had in ROM. ProDOS's basic.system (which was always used if present on a bootable ProDOS disk) made a few improvements later on, but it was still a bit awkward to use.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by KLU9
by zima on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 13:33 in reply to "Comment by KLU9"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

The resemblances between the retro geek in the video and ... er... me... is just too frightening to contemplate.

(although of course I was a BBC Micro user, not a C64 fan)

Well, the BBC Micro would be more properly British, I suppose ...so I imagine that means the retro geek in the video went a bit astray in his ways.
Maybe it's your long-lost evil twin brother?

Reply Parent Score: 2