Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Aug 2012 22:36 UTC
Windows Now that Windows 8 has gone gold, Microsoft can move on to other things. With Windows 8, the most important of these is probably to make sure people know how to actually use it. Metro is filled to the brim with hard-to-discover features, but Microsoft has a plan. Will it be enough?
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Usability lab?
by tanzam75 on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 03:07 UTC
tanzam75
Member since:
2011-05-19

The Windows 95 animation was added based on usability lab testing. Without it, people would just sit and stare at the screen, uncertain of what to do. With it, people quickly understood that they should click on the "Start" button. It didn't teach them all about how to use Windows 95 -- but it was enough to get them started exploring.

Presumably, they've tested the Metro animation in the usability lab as well, and verified that it was enough to get people started.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Usability lab?
by ze_jerkface on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 23:01 in reply to "Usability lab?"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

I wouldn't presume anything.

Sinofsky and Ballmer have gone of the rails.

Someone posted the results of trying Windows 8 on over a hundred enterprise users on the Windows 8 blog and Sinofsky deleted the comment. This is not software that is designed around user feedback.

A tutorial won't save Windows 8. If anything it will just add to the negative reputation.

A well designed UI is intuitive and can be learned through exploring. Windows 8 has a shitty UI as part of Sinofsky's plan for "one windows UI across all devices". This is incredibly stupid given that 99% of Windows users don't have a touch-screen device, nor will iPad owners run out to buy a Windows tablet just to have some new crappy UI.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Usability lab?
by bassbeast on Sat 4th Aug 2012 02:51 in reply to "RE: Usability lab?"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Hell look up "tries Windows 8 for the first time' on YouTube, its practically become a meme. I like the Nan one myself, sweet little old lady, just as lost as can be.

I have let so far around 400 users that came into the shop try Win 8 on the Athlon dual I set up in the corner for that purpose and so far? NOBODY liked it, not a one. personally i thought it was for the teeners/tweeners but they all said the same thing "I already have a cell phone duh! This is just lame" and walked off.

I can say ONE nice thing about metro, well two actually. 1.-It let me finally get some of my business customers that were dragging ass in getting off of XP (including one that still had 2 Win2K boxes going) by showing them what they had to look forward to if their machines died after Oct, so that got me plenty of new triple and quads builds so thanks for that MSFT, and 2.-If the backlash is anything like what I'm seeing I can look forward to another year and a half of wiping 8 for 7, just like I did Vista for XP. Since a nuke and install is fully automated it was easy money, thanks MSFT.

In the end while this may be good for a cell phone or a tablet it is NOT good for a desktop or lap. its not intuitive, not easily discoverable as the video shows, and it doesn't really follow cell phone or desktop conventions, and finally the switching back and forth between metro and desktop "app" (God how I hate that word) is jarring as hell. Its just not a good design folks and if any of you get stuck with Win 8 I'd urge you to try "classic shell". Its free, its easy, and it kills metro like Raid kills bugs...dead.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Usability lab?
by tomcat on Mon 6th Aug 2012 17:33 in reply to "RE: Usability lab?"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Someone posted the results of trying Windows 8 on over a hundred enterprise users on the Windows 8 blog and Sinofsky deleted the comment. This is not software that is designed around user feedback.


A. Windows 8 is not an enterprise-focused release. There are some features (fast boot, shutdown, lower power consumption, built-in hypervisor, etc) that would be appealing to Enterprise. But ...

B. Enterprises have just deployed to Windows 7. They generally don't upgrade to every OS release but, rather, skip every other. I think that Windows 8 will probably follow that same pattern.

C. I would expect that the Windows8-style-UI will evolve over time as new data is collected. Metro is a bold move on Microsoft's part -- and definitely controversial -- but it's something that the company definitely had to do to compete with the encroachment of the iPad.

A tutorial won't save Windows 8. If anything it will just add to the negative reputation.


Not sure what you mean by "save". Even Vista, which was a mediocre OS, sold a couple hundred million licenses. If that's failure, Microsoft would probably not mind failing.

A well designed UI is intuitive and can be learned through exploring. Windows 8 has a shitty UI as part of Sinofsky's plan for "one windows UI across all devices". This is incredibly stupid given that 99% of Windows users don't have a touch-screen device, nor will iPad owners run out to buy a Windows tablet just to have some new crappy UI.


I don't think you have a firm grasp on the future. More and more devices are moving to touch every day. It's going to be difficult to find devices that don't support it within the next 5 years.

Reply Parent Score: 2