Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 00:41 UTC, submitted by henderson101
OSNews, Generic OSes "Naren has been working on a port of Android 4.0 to Raspberry Pi, and as you can see from the screenshots and video below, he's been making great progress. Hardware-accelerated graphics and video have been up and running smoothly for some time; AudioFlinger support is the only major missing piece at the moment." Not sure how useful it is, but still pretty cool.
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Besides just being neat...
by Wodenhelm on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 06:13 UTC
Wodenhelm
Member since:
2010-07-16

...I also think this could be an important step towards non-proprietary/open/custom-built/whatever mobile devices and tablets. Right now, a person can put together a PC, but mobile is more important than it's ever been, and who can put that together? It can be done, but it's right hard to do. This should help tremendously, even if it's not immediately beneficial.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Besides just being neat...
by moondevil on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 07:17 in reply to "Besides just being neat..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Except that the Raspberry Pi requires a binary blob for the GPU.

Reply Parent Score: 6

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

With enough pressure and a little time, Broadcom may just change their minds on that. I'm still hopeful.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Besides just being neat...
by chithanh on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 12:22 in reply to "Besides just being neat..."
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

...I also think this could be an important step towards non-proprietary/open/custom-built/whatever mobile devices and tablets.

Linux runs on the Raspberry Pi, but that doesn't make it an open device. In fact it is more closed than your average PC and even more than many Android devices.

Every function or peripheral access needs a modified firmware blob. Only Broadcom can make those, and for some parts (like video decode) you even have to pay licensing fees before they give you a firmware blob that allows their proprietary drivers to perform the desired function.

Don't get me wrong, the Raspberry Pi is a great educational tool. But it is not open at all.

Reply Parent Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

What working in the enterprise world taught me, is that for most big companies, open source == cost zero.

No one really cares about what is open source all about, except a way to lower project costs, without giving anything back.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Besides just being neat...
by ilovebeer on Sun 5th Aug 2012 16:31 in reply to "Besides just being neat..."
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

...I also think this could be an important step towards non-proprietary/open/custom-built/whatever mobile devices and tablets. Right now, a person can put together a PC, but mobile is more important than it's ever been, and who can put that together? It can be done, but it's right hard to do. This should help tremendously, even if it's not immediately beneficial.

Maybe I'm missing something but how can this help tremendously? You may be overestimating what Rpi's capabilities. It's a neat little project platform but it lacks & has drawbacks in many areas. Depending on your usage, it can easily be a terrible choice. What I've found is that a lot of people raging about Rpi tend to settle down once they learn what it's _not_ capable of.

I also don't see a huge need to build a custom tablet. Tablets generally only focus on a small set of tasks -- they are largely just media consumption devices and don't really benefit from the ability to customize.

Reply Parent Score: 3