Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 3rd Aug 2012 00:41 UTC, submitted by henderson101
OSNews, Generic OSes "Naren has been working on a port of Android 4.0 to Raspberry Pi, and as you can see from the screenshots and video below, he's been making great progress. Hardware-accelerated graphics and video have been up and running smoothly for some time; AudioFlinger support is the only major missing piece at the moment." Not sure how useful it is, but still pretty cool.
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moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

Actually, you are now wrong. Linux used to be about low cost. For years that was the number one reason given regarding adoption in the enterprise. For the last couple years, the number one reason is now to prevent vendor lock in.


No I am not.

I work for a big consulting company that usually works with Fortune 500 customers, where the goals of each project are outsourcing plans and ways to lower development costs.

Assuming the customer is ok with the available licenses, open source is usually chosen to lower project costs, not because of quality nor to contribute anything back.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Assuming the customer is ok with the available licenses, open source is usually chosen to lower project costs, not because of quality nor to contribute anything back.


Dead on. Cost is certainly the biggest factor (taking into account all costs, of course, not just licensing). That doesn't mean those companies won't contribute back to the community, but it's not a priority, nor something they'll do if it costs them too much.

Reply Parent Score: 3

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

That doesn't mean those companies won't contribute back to the community, but it's not a priority, nor something they'll do if it costs them too much.


Actually it already happened in a few projects where we patched a few libraries/tools but the changes were never given back to the community.

The reasoning was that if anyone would discover that the company was using open source, it might be forced to open source their products. The fear is present, even when we need to get the company lawyer's green light to use certain licenses.

While asking for questions in public forums, mailing lists, we are not allowed to use any form of email address or reference that might create a relationship between the open source library/tool and the company that owns the project.

As I said, in the big boys club, open source is free as in "free beer" nothing more.

Reply Parent Score: 3