Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 00:54 UTC
Google This tweet from Tom Warren made me smile. So, it's 2012 and tablets are finally able to do what the Amiga did in 1985. Seems like a bit of a stretch to be excited about that, right? Sure, until I caught myself getting excited - only a bit, but still - by this piece of news. Update: removed me being an annoyed child.
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RE[7]: KISS
by WereCatf on Sun 5th Aug 2012 09:45 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: KISS"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

For example, every time you lock/unlock your device, you will have to authenticate with your passcode AND your user.


Err, why would you have to do that? You'd unlock the device just as you do now, only that there could be a dropdown-menu in some corner for changing to another user. When logging in to Windows, for example, do you always type your username or do you just click on your avatar? Most people do the latter and there is absolutely no technical reason for why it couldn't work the same on Android. Similarly, instead of a password one could just use the same methods one uses already: a PIN, face unlock, gestures etc.

To name one big technical issue: Android allows user level apps to run as a daemon in the background. If you go multi-user you have to keep running their daemons in the background even if the active user don't use them.


Android could just as well kill the daemons when the user is changed and restart them when that previous user logs in the next time.

As I said before, there's lots of "details". Multiuser isn't trivial at all.


It's more trivial than you think. You're giving a lot of totally bogus "issues" as examples, like e.g. that one must always log in with a username and password, and I don't know if you are deliberately trying to make it look harder than it actually is or if you just don't really understand multi-user task - and filesystem - mechanics. If it is the latter I offer to explain things or I can point you to resources if you would like to know more.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[8]: KISS
by sergio on Sun 5th Aug 2012 15:33 in reply to "RE[7]: KISS"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

Android could just as well kill the daemons when the user is changed and restart them when that previous user logs in the next time.


You cannot do that. If you kill daemons some notifications and events would never happen. People use phones and tablets as agendas you know.

If you want to be able to lend your tablet/phone for small period of time without compromising your data, the right thing to do is to create a temporal stateless Guest User system like Mac OS X has. You don't need multiuser to do that. That would be fine.

Multiuser support is too expensive in a mobile device, there's so much state information to keep... and precious resources like energy that you can't waste stupidly.

I think you are oversimplifying for the sake or being right, You have no idea about technical implications and I don't blame you, not everybody is an engineer.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[9]: KISS
by WereCatf on Sun 5th Aug 2012 15:56 in reply to "RE[8]: KISS"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

You have no idea about technical implications and I don't blame you, not everybody is an engineer.


You don't need to be an engineer for that. I am a software developer, I've been playing around with OSes and software ever since I was 12 years old - that is 18 years ago. But really, you stubbornly refuse to listen to anything and cling to your delusions and I can't be arsed to continue this.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[9]: KISS
by MOS6510 on Sun 5th Aug 2012 18:26 in reply to "RE[8]: KISS"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

First of all multi-user for a phone is stupid, why would anyone share a phone? Only when your kid wants to play a game.

On a tablet it makes more sense, but there's no need to have apps of the previous user to keep running. Just save the settings and I'd be happy.

I have an iPad, which my wife, son and sometimes other people use. I don't want them to mess up my stuff, they may need other apps and not apps I use, put them in another order.

Personally I don't even need/want authentication. If I didn't trust my family members they wouldn't get my iPad anyway. A tablet is for quick and easy use, not for time consuming login systems (a few seconds is already an annoyance).

My phone had a passcode, my tablet hasn't.

Reply Parent Score: 1