Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 04:17 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Quick - name the most important personal computer of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Those of you who mentioned the legendary Apple II - that's fine. I respect your decision. Forced to think objectively in 2012, I may even agree. But if you just named Radio Shack's TRS-80, you made me smile. Your choice is entirely defensible. And back in the TRS-80's heyday, I not only would have agreed with it but would have vehemently opposed any other candidate."
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RE[4]: Were TRS-80 clones legal?
by MOS6510 on Mon 6th Aug 2012 16:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Were TRS-80 clones legal?"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

I'd like to second that. Even the dumbest kids could and would at least code a few lines.

Most, if not all, home computers allowed you to start coding the moment you turned it on. And they came with a manual!

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't know if at most typing-in some BASIC listings counts as coding...

And zero documentation was even possibly more often the rule. Or, at best, only a manual written in a totally unknown language - not a good start to "work out" things, that you cherish in the days gone by.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I don't know if at most typing-in some BASIC listings counts as coding...


It's still a lot more code than the average user today types!


And zero documentation was even possibly more often the rule. Or, at best, only a manual written in a totally unknown language - not a good start to "work out" things, that you cherish in the days gone by.


In The Netherlands you got a Dutch manual with your Commodore 64. Hell, even the tape recorder had one!

Reply Parent Score: 2