Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 04:17 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Quick - name the most important personal computer of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Those of you who mentioned the legendary Apple II - that's fine. I respect your decision. Forced to think objectively in 2012, I may even agree. But if you just named Radio Shack's TRS-80, you made me smile. Your choice is entirely defensible. And back in the TRS-80's heyday, I not only would have agreed with it but would have vehemently opposed any other candidate."
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RE[8]: Were TRS-80 clones legal?
by MOS6510 on Tue 7th Aug 2012 04:48 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Were TRS-80 clones legal?"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Well, trivial GUI tasks isn't coding.

A home computer allowed you to start coding the moment you turned it on, it was easy to get quick results, there was a manual and apart from running software from tape/disk you couldn't do anything else but code, unlike now where you can waste hours on YouTube.

Sure, a lot of people probably didn't get beyond
10 PRINT"ZIMA"
20 GOTO 10
But it's a program!

These days there are a lot of self proclaimed PC experts that will fix/mess up computers from family members and friends, but they have never written a line of code. In the 80s you needed to get past the above example to become something of an expert.

5 REM THE AMAZING COLOR ZIMA!
10 POKE 53280,0:POKE 53281,0
20 PRINT CHR$(147)
30 FOR C=1 to 15
40 POKE 646,C
50 PRINT"ZIMA! ";
60 NEXT C
70 GOTO 30

See, I'm an expert! :-p

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't know... with trivial GUI tasks, do those people with post-its (people that I describe closer in http://www.osnews.com/permalink?530795 ) really have any sort of proficiency in using the GUI?

And it seems to me that lots (most?) of BASIC "coding" was fairly similar.

Reply Parent Score: 2