Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 6th Aug 2012 00:00 UTC
X11, Window Managers We have some very good news for those of us with a love for the Common Desktop Environment. I'm a huge fan of CDE - I've even dedicated an article to it - so I'm excited about this. CDE has been released as open source under the LGPL, and can be downloaded as of today for Debian and Ubuntu. Motif will follow later.
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RE[5]: Comment by marcp
by tylerdurden on Tue 7th Aug 2012 08:25 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by marcp"
tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

CDE is not a wheel you want to use as a foundation for anything, it was a mess of a desktop environment. It basically was the pinnacle of "designed by committee." IMO CDE was one of the reasons why commercial Unix workstations went the way of the DoDo.

I think a lot of people's views in this thread about CDE are tragically warped by the lens of nostalgia...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by marcp
by kaiwai on Fri 10th Aug 2012 16:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by marcp"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

CDE is not a wheel you want to use as a foundation for anything, it was a mess of a desktop environment. It basically was the pinnacle of "designed by committee." IMO CDE was one of the reasons why commercial Unix workstations went the way of the DoDo.

I think a lot of people's views in this thread about CDE are tragically warped by the lens of nostalgia...


UNIX workstations died not because of the lack of commonality but the fact that SGI, SUN and IBM couldn't get it through their thick skull that no one is going to pay $15,000 for a workstation when a 'good enough' workstation running Windows on an x86 chip could do the job quite nicely. Sorry to break the bad news but the world runs on 'good enough technology' and not the best, most sexy, most awesome pinnacle of engineering in a particular field. Sorry but had the UNIX workstation pricing dropped at the same rate as the PC and reached parity people would have been able to look over the imperfections just as people were able to look over the imperfections of Windows NT and Linux in the early days.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by marcp
by zima on Fri 10th Aug 2012 21:14 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by marcp"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Thing is, any parity in price-drops (or, more generally, in price/performance ratios) wasn't even really achievable for traditional UNIX workstations. Meanwhile, the economies of scale (of that "good enough" approach) afforded the PC working itself upwards, eventually surpassing the "pro" hardware/software.

Joining the PC world did seem to help the only remaining prominent *nix workstation, Mac Pro, for some time ...but it's still visibly slipping away as of late, uprooted also by more traditional PC OEMs.

Reply Parent Score: 2