Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 6th Aug 2012 00:00 UTC
X11, Window Managers We have some very good news for those of us with a love for the Common Desktop Environment. I'm a huge fan of CDE - I've even dedicated an article to it - so I'm excited about this. CDE has been released as open source under the LGPL, and can be downloaded as of today for Debian and Ubuntu. Motif will follow later.
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RE: Comment by marcp
by thegman on Tue 7th Aug 2012 09:03 UTC in reply to "Comment by marcp"
thegman
Member since:
2007-01-30

I'm not sure what the problem is, it's not "closed", as it's now Open Source. I'm not sure how it's "outdated" as I use it all the time, and I don't know of anything it does not do, that it really needs to. Sure there are features I'd like, but that's the case for all desktops. I don't find it buggy, I use it every day, I see more glitches in Windows 7 and Mac OS X, and I sure as hell see more in Android.

Any real benefit? Maybe not to you, maybe not to me either, even as a user of CDE every day.

With respect, I think you make a lot of assumptions just because it's old. CDE is very solid, and runs quick. It's not a big "look at me" desktop with 3D effects or "dashboards" nobody wants. It does it's minimal job very well and stays out of the way.

In my experience, older software seems to be somewhat *less* buggy. It's probably due to a smaller code base (less code, fewer bugs), longer product cycle for stamping out issues, and pretty much no features added in a hurry because it's in fashion at the time.

By all means, try out CDE and decide it's crap, but again, with respect, you're stating a lot of problems with CDE which do not exist.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by zima on Fri 10th Aug 2012 20:50 in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

In my experience, older software seems to be somewhat *less* buggy. It's probably due to a smaller code base (less code, fewer bugs), longer product cycle for stamping out issues, and pretty much no features added in a hurry because it's in fashion at the time.

Nah, we mostly remember the relatively few positive examples (and those which survived, which still can be used; long-maintained hence, duh, decently debugged) - while forgetting tons of negative ones.

Similar effects with the popular myths about old films and music, or the general "old times were better" ...we just don't remember so well all the crap that was pushed, how the nice stuff wasn't so available and discoverable (a'la imdb or last.fm)

Reply Parent Score: 2