Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 12th Aug 2012 21:15 UTC, submitted by Torbjorn Vik Lunde
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless One of the major patents being discussed in the Apple vs. Samsung cases all around the world is inertia scrolling. Apple claims to have invented it, but in fact, Sun was working on a PDA in the early '90s called the Star7, which had inertia scrolling. In a demonstration posted to YouTube, you can see this device in action, including the touch screen inertial scrolling. James Gosling (yup, that one), the narrator of the video, even mentions it specifically. This looks like a case of prior art for this patent, and serves to demonstrate that, no, despite all these grandiose claims, Apple did not invent this at all, which further illustrates the complete and utter lunacy of the patent system in the software world. The Star7's interface is reminiscent of Microsoft Bob, and makes me want to forcefully introduce my head to my recently-painted walls. Still, it's an interesting device; 1992 is when the first fully touchscreen PDA was released (the Tandy Zoomer, by what would eventually become Palm), and a year before the Newton arrived on the scene. Luckily for us, the Star7 never made it to market. That interface gives me nightmares...
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RE[2]: Can it be used?
by Tony Swash on Mon 13th Aug 2012 14:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Can it be used?"
Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

That's for lawyers to argue.


If it were relevant. It doesn't appear to be relevant because the video, and the product it showed, does not use the bounce animation to indicate overscroll, and it is the overscroll bounce which is the key feature in Apple's patent and in it's legal actions.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Can it be used?
by tupp on Mon 13th Aug 2012 16:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Can it be used?"
tupp Member since:
2006-11-12

Bounce-back existed in non-Apple products before Apple patented this obvious feature: LaunchTile and its email application; Lira Reference.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Can it be used?
by Tony Swash on Mon 13th Aug 2012 16:33 in reply to "RE[3]: Can it be used?"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Bounce-back existed in non-Apple products before Apple patented this obvious feature: LaunchTile and its email application; Lira Reference.


Can you be clearer with your reference please? Maybe include a link.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Can it be used?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Wed 15th Aug 2012 23:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Can it be used?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

"That's for lawyers to argue.


If it were relevant. It doesn't appear to be relevant because the video, and the product it showed, does not use the bounce animation to indicate overscroll, and it is the overscroll bounce which is the key feature in Apple's patent and in it's legal actions.
"

Uh huh, that must be why they sued Palm when webOS implemented the exact same functionality. Oh, what's that you say? They didn't, even after Cook's thinly-veiled threats? Hmm, what's the difference? Palm, a company that was circling the drain already, had little chance of competing against Apple, yet also stood a good chance of wiping the floor with Apple by suing over infringement of their own patent portfolio. Or Samsung, a prosperous & diversified company that poses a serious competitive risk to Apple.

If I'm not being clear enough for you, allow me to spell it out: if you believe that Apple's legal action against Samsung is anything other than a purely-opportunistic, strategic move, then you're deluding yourself.

But hey, you go ahead and keep on repeating the rhetoric that Apple is just doing what they have to fight off the hordes of big mean thieves stealing their precious, original IP. Maybe someone will even believe it.

Reply Parent Score: 2