Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Aug 2012 23:47 UTC
Internet & Networking Twitter is changing its API guidelines. Lots of new restrictions and limitations for third party clients. I'm within 140 characters.
Thread beginning with comment 531425
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Comment by redshift
by fretinator on Fri 17th Aug 2012 21:31 UTC in reply to "Comment by redshift"
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, if you notice, the new "Everything Shared" plans all have unlimited calls and text - only the paltry few Gigs of data is limited. They realize people are switching off of voice. They have to tap the data as a resource stream now. I've been using mobile data since about 2000. At first it was unlimited for $5/month. then $10, then $15, Now unless you have Sprint or one of the prepaids, it is a crazy price. I think I pay $30 for 3GB. Therefore, I don't stream videos, mostly just email and games. It is funny that at the same time they are pushing LTE for amazing Hi-Def video, they have data-limited plans that efectively keep you from watching anything but an occasional Youtube dancing kitty.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by redshift
by Alfman on Sat 18th Aug 2012 04:26 in reply to "RE: Comment by redshift"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

fretinator,

No kidding, I always think to myself that I'd LIKE to have a data plan especially while I'm away or on the road...but then I see the price. Just a few weeks ago I was at a tmobile store and asked about data-only rates for laptops, and I think it was $60/mo for 5GB plus something ridiculous for overage. I honestly don't know how much bandwidth I'd need/use, but I can't afford an additional $700+ / year for mobile internet, especially since I'm at home most of the time. I'd always be worried about going over with streaming video.

It'd probably be cheaper to use a cell phone and attempt to tether it against the terms of use agreement - has anyone here tried this?

Several years ago I contemplated using the free intra-network mobile voice calling and modulating data across a bluetooth link to the phone. I kind of had a proof of concept working using ham radio soft-modems which could communicate via sound cards (including the bluetooth sound driver emulation). But I figured it wouldn't be worth the effort to make it production-ready because it's likely I'd just be blocked for service abuse.

Edited 2012-08-18 04:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by redshift
by Morgan on Sat 18th Aug 2012 20:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by redshift"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Sprint's "everything" plans are very competitive, giving you truly unlimited data, voice and texts, with just a $10/month "smartphone tax" which still keeps my bill well under what I was paying at T-Mobile.

The downside is that Sprint doesn't have good coverage everywhere, and their mobile broadband for laptops isn't unlimited like it is on phones. The price for that kind of thing is prohibitively expensive for anyone who doesn't absolutely rely on it for their business.

The great thing about both T-Mobile and Sprint is that they are very relaxed about tethering. If you have an Android or BlackBerry phone with it built in, they don't seem to notice occasional tethering. I've even read (anecdotal) accounts of Sprint employees dropping hints to customers on how to tether without buying the separate plan.

Since I picked up a Nexus S 4G, I've used the built in tethering app without any problems. Granted, I'm not pulling down multi-gigabyte ISOs or anything crazy like that, but it's there when I'm in a pinch and need it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by redshift
by Soulbender on Mon 20th Aug 2012 12:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by redshift"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

and asked about data-only rates for laptops, and I think it was $60/mo for 5GB plus something ridiculous for overage.


Hmm..I pay ~$5/week prepaid for unlimited mobile broadband. Granted the quality can be a bit of a roller coaster ride but it's still a pretty good deal.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by redshift
by zima on Mon 20th Aug 2012 03:26 in reply to "RE: Comment by redshift"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It is funny that at the same time they are pushing LTE for amazing Hi-Def video, they have data-limited plans that efectively keep you from watching anything but an occasional Youtube dancing kitty.

LTE in such context is probably more about spectral efficiency - stuffing more people into & getting more overall bandwidth out of the available spectrum, with "adequate" performance per terminal (this will be probably even more a focus for "5G" in a decade or so; at some point, speeds become good enough).

Edited 2012-08-20 03:28 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2