Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Aug 2012 22:14 UTC
Legal "The web has been alight these past few weeks with the details of the Apple v. Samsung lawsuit. It's been a unique opportunity to peer behind the curtain of how these two companies operate, as the trial seeks to answer the question: did Samsung copy Apple? But there's actually another question that I think is much more interesting to the future of innovation in the technology industry: regardless of whether the courts say that Samsung copied Apple or not, would we all be better off if we allowed - even encouraged - companies to copy one another?" This is very relevant.
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Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Tue 21st Aug 2012 04:47 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

"Apple didn't stop innovating at all. Instead: they came out with the iMac."

Yeah, but they almost went bankrupt before that and it took the return of Steve and a financial injection from Micrsoft to save them. After that it still took a couple of years to become relevant. Probably the iPod, more than the iMac, put new wind in their sails.

"Copying" probably benefits the consumer in the sort run, but it stops innovation from companies in the long one. Without any game changers companies, like Samsung, just copy others and keep adding bells 'n' whistles to their products, but never really change anything.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by kwan_e on Tue 21st Aug 2012 05:42 in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"Copying" probably benefits the consumer in the sort run, but it stops innovation from companies in the long one.


Again, this has not been proven, and one of the articles points to instances where the real world does the opposite.

As long as consumers benefit from (and thus demand) innovation, companies will continue to innovate. There is no incentive for any company to innovate if it can ride on the back of one innovation made years ago.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Tue 21st Aug 2012 05:54 in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

RIM and Microsoft have seemed to be able to create products that don't imitate Apple products. This is innovation, this is what customers give a real and clear choice.

What hinders innovation are the huge number of silly patents, like attaching a picture to an email(!?). Even if you made a totally different product you can still get hit when that product can attach a picture to an email.

A patent like this isn't an invention, an innovation or even "it's obvious with hindsight, but you never would have thought about it yourself".

Reply Parent Score: 3

v RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Tue 21st Aug 2012 08:27 in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"