Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Aug 2012 08:29 UTC
Apple "AT&T is defending its decision to limit the use of Apple's video chat feature, FaceTime, to its Mobile Share data plans by saying that the limitation does not violate the FCC's net neutrality rules. The company wrote in a blog post on Wednesday that some groups had 'another knee-jerk reaction' to AT&T's limitation, but the company argues that its decision meets all FCC requirements." You can expect Verizon to follow suit soon. Carriers don't do things like this unless they know the competition will tag along. This also happens to explain why Apple probably can't do much about it; if both Verizon and AT&T give FaceTime the boot like this, there's little Apple can do. For what it's worth - I'm happy The Netherlands (and Chile!) has unconditional net neutrality. This would not fly here, further illustrating the need for net neutrality.
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RE: net neutrality isn't neutral...
by iskios on Thu 23rd Aug 2012 11:23 UTC in reply to "net neutrality isn't neutral..."
iskios
Member since:
2005-07-06

I guess you believe the Power company should tell you you cannot use your electric heating unit unless you go to their more expensive "Live Sustainer" plan right? Or that the water company can tell you you can use the water service for everything except bathing, unless you go for the higher priced "Cleanliness" plan?

Before you say it isn't the same, it is. You are paying for access to something and these companies are now slowly gouging you for every nickel and dime by taking back normal uses. It's the crack business paradigm. Let them use it, then take it back so they have to pay more, and it's scuzzy.

Reply Parent Score: 3

marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

Please take a look at philosophical concepts of positive and negative freedom. You'll get many interresting things out of it.

Positive freedom is all about "I want to do this and that [no matter what, who, etc]"

Negative freedom is all about "I want to be free from you doing this or that [no matter what, who, etc]".

It is absolutely horrifying that people - nowadays - have absolutely no clue about the fact that their freedom is limited with the freedom of others. The hurt others until they don't get hurt themselves. Then they're suddenly shocked. This is so rediculous and just senseless. So little thinking, so much acting. Only "me, me, I want, I'm gonna do". Damn!

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

The whole unlimited data plan seems to be the problem. There just isn't enough spectrum around for everyone to use as much as they want, so they have to ration it. The most fair way to do that is to pay per unit consumed. Like electricity, water ( some communities just charge a flat fee), ect.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Perhaps it would also help if metering didn't start for everybody from the same moment, the beginning of the month - possibly too many people jump on using the network at that time - but be more evenly spread throughout the month.

(but overall, we just seem to perceive the world as if it didn't have limits... NVM http://www.osnews.com/permalink?532676 when there's http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Human_welfare_and_ecological_foot... or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_boundaries )

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Well there is some ambiguity in the examples you gave...
It's ultimately about the capacity of the pipe (and/or source) in all given cases.

Yes, electric company effectively can (and does) limit the amount of electricity used in a "basic" plan - by specifying the maximum current and voltage that goes into the house (and electric heating is quite power-hungry), and giving you an option of more "industrial" installation (say, the 400 V one; in the future, it should be useful also for charging electric cars).
And there definitely are (coming from the inherent nature of electric supply generation limits & economics - base load vs peak load) electric supply plans which, in practice, tell you when it's best to turn on that heater or laundry machine... (when it's cheapest - at night)

Water similar - what when there isn't enough capacity for all & only rationing makes it somewhat usable if everybody wants to bathe?
(and, really, a full-blown bath isn't required for cleanliness and hygiene - by implying so you're kinda mocking most of people, who do fine with much smaller amounts of water, and/or you are falling into "western problems" thinking...
...plus generally, for bathing or washing, a drinkable water is absolutely not required - which kinda even makes two-tier approach logical)

Edited 2012-08-28 04:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2