Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 25th Aug 2012 19:40 UTC
In the News "Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, died Saturday, weeks after heart surgery and days after his 82nd birthday on Aug. 5. Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon on July 20, 1969, and he radioed back to Earth the historic news of 'one giant leap for mankind'. He spent nearly three hours walking on the moon with fellow astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin." Our thoughts are with his family and friends. Such a great man. The world lost a true legendary hero today. This man will be an inspiration for generations to come.
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RE: What's all the fuss about
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 07:40 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

He wasn't a hero


What's your definition of hero?

and he was no greater than any of his numerous other colleagues waiting to take that seat.


Here's a lesson in simple logic for you:

The statement "Neil Armstrong is a hero" does not imply "Therefore he was greater than his colleagues".

Your complaint is thus idiotic.

The true heroes and great men are the scientists and engineers working their ass off to get him (up) there; the ones who didn't receive any sort of praise or credit.


They receive praise and credit ALL THE TIME. Neill is receiving praise and credit today especially is because HE DIED. When those scientists and engineers die, they too will get the praise and credit on that day.

Recognizing someone on a special occasion does not result in a shortage of supply for the next praiseworthy person or act.

There's an art to cynicism. You do not have it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

bowkota Member since:
2011-10-12


They receive praise and credit ALL THE TIME. Neill is receiving praise and credit today especially is because HE DIED. When those scientists and engineers die, they too will get the praise and credit on that day.

Errr, I'm pretty sure many of the NASA engineers responsible for that mission have passed away since then. You are aware that such a project is supported by hundreds of engineers. I'm pretty sure that there haven't been any headlines for them.

I understand the publicity; people want to celebrate this man's life because for some reason he was important to them. However I object to the over-exaggeration of his accomplishments and all the hero statements being thrown around.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by Alfman on Sun 26th Aug 2012 15:01 in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

kwan_e,

I agree with the OP that we tend to over-credit the individual and under-credit the team, many of whom will never get public recognition for their efforts.

Not to be disrespectful to Armstrong, his moon landing is a testament to human achievement and he deserves credit for being the first, but he would probably admit that he was a *very* lucky guy to have landed that role, it might have easily gone to someone else.

Reply Parent Score: 3

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Well, he did mention something about a small step for one man and a giant leap for mankind as he got of his ride.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

but he would probably admit that he was a *very* lucky guy to have landed that role, it might have easily gone to someone else.


He would admit it. But it doesn't change the fact that no one would choose a less qualified pilot to do the first lunar landing. It wasn't through luck that he was one of the best test pilots available for the job.

Reply Parent Score: 1