Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 28th Aug 2012 20:46 UTC
Linux "For years now, Linux has been a black sheep standing in the shadow of Apple and Microsoft. Despite having a fervent and enthusiastic following, the operating system hasn't been able to grab a sizable share of the computing market and has instead been content to subsist on the customers that come away dissatisfied with the mainstream competition. But that may be about to change. With the release of Microsoft Windows 8 on the horizon, some are saying Linux may have a great opportunity to steal a significant share of the market away from Microsoft, allowing it to finally take the helm as a major operating system service provider." This has to stop, and the only reason I'm linking to this nonsense is to make this very clear: Linux will not magically conquer the desktop or even make any significant gains because of Windows 8. People who don't like Windows 8 (Vista) will continue to use Windows 7 (Windows XP). This is getting so tiring. And does it even matter? Linux is winning big time in the mobile space, server space, and countless other spaces. The desktop is and always has been irrelevant to Linux.
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Comment by Bobthearch
by Bobthearch on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:03 UTC
Bobthearch
Member since:
2006-01-27

some are saying Linux may have a great opportunity to steal a significant share of the market away from Microsoft

Only if OEMs pre-install Linux on machines and stores stock them on the shelves.

It also remains to be seen how typical home computer buyers will react to Windows 8. Seems that the majority of technical-oriented users don't care for the new interface, but that's not an indicator of future sales.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Comment by Bobthearch
by orestes on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:07 in reply to "Comment by Bobthearch"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

Exactly. If a distro, probably Ubuntu, got significant OEM backing it might gain some ground. Until then this talk of stealing market share from MS is just silly. If anything people who don't like 8 will just elect to remain with 7.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Bobthearch
by Bobthearch on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bobthearch"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I'm thinking of upgrading XP to Windows 7. Probably won't do it, just thinking about it. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Bobthearch
by shmerl on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:20 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bobthearch"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

The real way to deal with it is to give MS serious legal beating for anticompetitive bundling. But so far they masterfully evaded such kind of outcome by escaping the equation. I.e. if refund is possible for the Windows tax - they aren't violating the law. And refund is delegated to OEMs who make it a nightmare to get. In the end MS comes out "clean" and Windows is still de facto bundled to computers all around.

So some successful cases against OEMs (like this one:
http://www.techworld.com.au/article/414500/lenovo_ordered_pay_1920_... )
can decrease their eagerness to play MS's game and will benefit Linux over all.

Edited 2012-08-28 21:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Bobthearch
by tylerdurden on Tue 28th Aug 2012 22:35 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bobthearch"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

DELL sold Ubuntu machines for a while, so did HP (I think), there are some Linux-only vendors too.

Here is the thing; except for a few large institutional orders, nobody cared. There simply are not killer Linux apps for the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Bobthearch
by smashIt on Tue 28th Aug 2012 23:25 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bobthearch"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

If a distro, probably Ubuntu, got significant OEM backing it might gain some ground.


vista didn't help linux
netbooks with linux preinstalled didn't help linux
do you realy believe metro will do the trick?
i don't....

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Bobthearch
by shmerl on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:17 in reply to "Comment by Bobthearch"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Yep. Windows tax is the strongest blocker for Linux adoption, and the hardest to break, since MS evades antitrust regulations by delegating this issue to OEMs and pretending that they aren't involved.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by Bobthearch
by ze_jerkface on Tue 28th Aug 2012 21:59 in reply to "Comment by Bobthearch"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

Dell installed Ubuntu on netbooks and laptops and then Ubuntu borked them with updates.

But let's keep blaming OEMs even though they have made tons of money from pre-installing Linux on servers.

I blame HP.

Reply Parent Score: 2