Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2012 14:14 UTC, submitted by fran
BeOS & Derivatives Haiku's 64bit port is progressing nicely. "As you can see, this looks pretty much like a regular Haiku desktop. There's still a lot of things missing, though - not many apps or drivers yet. However, most things should be fairly simple to get working, typically just a few compilation fixes."
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No it isnt
Member since:
2005-11-14

Because if any user is root, then any user can give any other user access to everything on the system without as much as an exploit. Completely by accident.

Reply Parent Score: 4

jayrulez Member since:
2011-10-17

The multi-user concept is not the only way to provide security. An operating system is not inherently insecure because it does not provide multi-user support.

Here is an hypothetical operating system: It does not have a multi-user implementation. However, privileged operations can only be performed by passing security mechanisms like fingerprint or retina scans. Does that make it more insecure than a multi-user operating system?

Multi-user systems have their own issues. Think privilege escalation, confused deputy problem etc...

Computer security is a complex thing and there is no -one way- of dealing with it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

In a typical Ubuntu installation, you are the only user and can pass your credentials to the apps that need higher privileges.

A monouser OS with such behavior is equally secure than a multiuser OS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

In any Ubuntu installation, there are several users like root (yes, despite it not having its own login), dbus and nobody in addition to the end user's own account. A single user system, by definition, does not have that kind of privilege separation.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

Because if any user is root, then any user can give any other user access to everything on the system without as much as an exploit.

You don't need a multi-user scenario to prevent things like that, you need something like sudo/UAC, a special passworded command that allows you to do things which can affect the actual system.

Reply Parent Score: 2