Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2012 22:52 UTC
Linux Miguel de Icaza: "To sum up: (a) First dimension: things change too quickly, breaking both open source and proprietary software alike; (b) incompatibility across Linux distributions. This killed the ecosystem for third party developers trying to target Linux on the desktop. You would try once, do your best effort to support the 'top' distro or if you were feeling generous 'the top three' distros. Only to find out that your software no longer worked six months later. Supporting Linux on the desktop became a burden for independent developers." Mac OS X came along to scoop up the Linux defectors.
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RE[2]: Comment by Vordreller
by Mr. Dee on Thu 30th Aug 2012 07:11 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Vordreller"
Mr. Dee
Member since:
2005-11-13

Incorrect, there are only three main editions of Windows 7 the average user is exposed to in mainstream markets and its tailored to their needs:

Home Premium - for home users
Professionals - for business users
Ultimate - for those who want it all

If you drop in specialized editions, it is still not a dozen:
Starter - introductory edition for basic needs web browsing, emailing, basic office productivity. Most users I know upgrade this Home Premium.

Home Basic - emerging markets, pretty much similar to Starter with more flexible options such as ability to apply themes.

Enterprise - larger businesses who deploy Windows on mass and have multi-lingual sites world wide. Comes with unique management tools such as MDOP.

At the end of the day, they are all Windows at the core. AutoCAD 2013 which can run on Windows 7 Ultimate can also run on Windows 7 Starter.

Linux on the other hand has different distributions, desktop environments, package management and support options. As someone noted, Windows 7 Starter and other editions can be targetted by just having one particular edition and you know it will be supported for the next 10 years.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Vordreller
by smashIt on Thu 30th Aug 2012 09:24 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Vordreller"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

Incorrect, there are only three main editions of Windows 7 the average user is exposed to in mainstream markets and its tailored to their needs:


see, you don't even think of the other editions

there are 6 windows 7
8 windows server 2008
1 windows home server
and 1 windows mobilephone whatevertheycallitnow

there are even more, but these 4 groups are popular enough that everyone should at least have heard of them

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Vordreller
by l3v1 on Thu 30th Aug 2012 11:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Vordreller"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Linux on the other hand has different distributions, desktop environments, package management and support options. As someone noted, Windows 7 Starter and other editions can be targetted by just having one particular edition and you know it will be supported for the next 10 years.


What you want could only be done in a coporate setting, one distro in one hand, one decision point, and everyone else falling in line, which would mean the elimination of all other distros.

This was never the goal of Linux, thus it's around high time to stop b*ching about having multiple distros, versions, GUIs and package systems. This is a neverending histeria and it's totally pointless. Use Windows, use OSX, but then for f*k's sake, be done with compaining about how the Linux world works.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Vordreller
by smashIt on Thu 30th Aug 2012 12:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Vordreller"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

What you want could only be done in a coporate setting, one distro in one hand, one decision point, and everyone else falling in line, which would mean the elimination of all other distros.


no, all it needs is a official baseline distribution from torwalds
just look at the BSDs

Reply Parent Score: 3