Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2012 22:52 UTC
Linux Miguel de Icaza: "To sum up: (a) First dimension: things change too quickly, breaking both open source and proprietary software alike; (b) incompatibility across Linux distributions. This killed the ecosystem for third party developers trying to target Linux on the desktop. You would try once, do your best effort to support the 'top' distro or if you were feeling generous 'the top three' distros. Only to find out that your software no longer worked six months later. Supporting Linux on the desktop became a burden for independent developers." Mac OS X came along to scoop up the Linux defectors.
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RE[2]: ...
by nej_simon on Thu 30th Aug 2012 09:53 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
nej_simon
Member since:
2011-02-11

Define "old". OSX for intel was released in 2005 so if your applications are more than seven years old then they aren't supported any more. Of course not everything written for an old version of OSX will run on ML but compared to Linux backward compatibility is pretty good which is his point.

"And anyways, he switches OS because he loves his phone so much. That is just pathetic IMO."

That might be because the dev tools for the iPhone only run on OSX.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by kragil on Fri 31st Aug 2012 09:49 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Yadda, yadda. He is talking about Photoshop from 2001 and that won't work on Mountain Lion. Full of shit I say.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: ...
by nej_simon on Fri 31st Aug 2012 21:13 in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

He gives photoshop from 2001 as en example of a windows application that still work on Windows 8.

"Meanwhile, you can still run the 2001 Photoshop that came when XP was launched on Windows 8. And you can still run your old OSX apps on Mountain Lion."

Reply Parent Score: 2

Supported software and OS
by Lennie on Sat 1st Sep 2012 14:55 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

64-bit windows doesn't support DOS or 16-bit Windows 3.x programs either.

Linux is source-compatible with pretty much any commandline program from the 1990's.

And many original Unix programs.

Modern Linux programs do have some bloat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nbv9L-WIu0s

Reply Parent Score: 2