Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 00:39 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Efforts are split between models in which keyboards detach from screens, ones in which the keys remain attached but can be hidden behind displays, and traditional fixed clamshell designs." None of these really float my boat. They work with clunky connectors and weird hinges, while I'd much rather have Surface's nice magnetic connection. On top of that, Surface just looks way better than this stuff. Pretty clear why Microsoft felt the need to make their own hardware.
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RE: piss poor design
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 06:29 UTC in reply to "piss poor design"
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

Sad but true. Windows 8 absolutely sucks a big one with a traditional keyboard-and-mouse setup, and I would imagine it would be even worse with a typical laptop trackpad-and-keyboard interface, so everyone is busy trying to fling shit at the fan to see what sticks and doesn't come back to splash right back in their faces. This is not innovation; this is companies desperately trying to make something work that just doesn't, and it will probably never work as well as a traditional desktop for anyone who needs real power, no matter how much you try to change and mangle the physical interface in an attempt to try to make it fit.

For a company that spent so much money on R&D to come up with a GUI that, for the most part, is extremely easy to figure out and understand even for an idiot and complete newcomer to computers, it is amazing that they allowed this garbage to get to the heads of their upper management and start forcing this crap down millions of computer users' throats. This is a pure marketing gimmick--it only has the potential (key word there) to benefit a small group of users that buy a specialty/mobile form factor touchscreen device. To everyone else, it's a big flip of the bird.

It might be causing some very short-term innovation between companies right now, specifically for mobile touchscreen-based devices, but as I see it in the long term we all lose. Anyone who wants real power, at least. Windows 8--just like Windows Vista and ME before it--is a disgrace.

Edited 2012-09-03 06:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: piss poor design
by bassbeast on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 10:00 in reply to "RE: piss poor design"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

The reason how this got past usability testing is simple friend...the X86 PC is flatline and frankly its gonna STAY flatline because once we hit multicores PCs went way past good enough and are into insanely overpowered. This means that the PC will be like a washer and dryer, only replaced when it dies.

Meanwhile the ARM tablet is undergoing its own MHz race just as PCs did in the 90s and MSFT has pretty much ZERO percentage of that market, same goes for ARM cellphones. So Ballmer is throwing the Hail Mary and praying to every Deity in the book that he can gain some share.

Whether it will work or not I guess will depend on how much money Ballmer is willing to flush, if he sells iPad specced hardware at Kindle prices? he might be able to buy some share and hope it gets made up on the appstore. I think it will bomb on the X86 though, most likely it'll be like Vista where the OEMs offer you a "Windows 8 system" with Win 7 and a DVD in the bottom of the box nobody uses.

But I do feel sorry for the OEMs though, knowing just like Vista MSFT won't let them sell Win 7 PCs until the sales take a dive like with Vista and in a bad economy having 6 months of no sales is gonna seriously hurt.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: piss poor design
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 19:16 in reply to "RE[2]: piss poor design"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

The difference is, a quality washer or dryer can potentially last at least 15-20 years or longer with maintenance. Windows, the operating system almost exclusively sold with PCs, typically gets infections galore and eventually takes a shit within maybe 3-5 years (and I'm being generous). Quite often, people think the PC is then junk, and that it's either not worth the time, trouble and money repairing, or just not possible. And then there are those people who have become pissed off with their entire computer over how badly Windows is running, they give up on the whole machine, and even if they're told it could be fixed they'd rather just trash it and get a new one.

I've used a 2001 Gateway with a 1.7GHz P4 and only 256MB RAM (RD-RAM--rare, expensive and not worth the price to upgrade) for over a decade before giving up on it, but trust me, that thing could be a supercomputer running Windows out of the box and many people would get rid of it for something new after once or twice getting infected, and experiencing the poor performance, pop-ups, errors and blue screens.

Also, I wouldn't say that computers are "insanely overpowered." With all the bloated operating systems being released these days under the assumption that the user will have a fast processor, loads of RAM, and even hardware accelerated, power is just as important as it's always been if you care about performance. It's just that these days, you don't have to think as hard or spend as much money to get something decent. You don't really think hardware is getting many times faster while software remains exactly the same in terms of speed and efficiency, do you?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: piss poor design
by WorknMan on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 16:25 in reply to "RE: piss poor design"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

This is not innovation; this is companies desperately trying to make something work that just doesn't, and it will probably never work as well as a traditional desktop for anyone who needs real power, no matter how much you try to change and mangle the physical interface in an attempt to try to make it fit.


Well, that's the cool thing about Windows 8... if you need 'real power', just press Win+D, and you're off to the races ;)

Of course, most people (probably 90% of them), don't need all those bells and whistles, so Metro will probably do fine for them, which is what MS is counting on. Of course, I have no idea if tech tards will take to Metro or not... only time will tell. Sure it's different, but then so was iOS and Android.

As for Windows 8 'classic' desktop, it's got some features that Win7 doesn't, such as native USB 3.0 support, taskbars on multiple monitors, hyper-v virtualization, improved task manager, native ISO mounting, etc. Plus, it runs faster and on less memory. It's not a huge improvement, but for $40, I plan on taking the plunge.

Edited 2012-09-03 16:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: piss poor design
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 19:30 in reply to "RE[2]: piss poor design"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Use it while you still can, because it's clear Microsoft has every intention to eradicate the traditional desktop from Windows as "obsolete" technology as soon as they can. The whole desktop will soon enough go the way of the classic Start menu. You know, when the menu was actually still there, and back before they made it all fancy with two panes and a user picture (IMO, a major step down, introduced in XP and forced onto users in Vista).

iOS and Android may have been different, but they weren't attempted to be be forced on traditional mouse/trackpad and keyboards-based desktop and laptop machines. They were specifically designed for and installed on portable devices with a touchscreen, like phones and tablet computers. Big difference there, because Microsoft is creating a Frankenstein monster with (for now) two completely different graphical user interfaces that have no resemblance to each other, either in appearance, usage, or even intended devices to be used on.

It's what Microsoft should have released separately as "Windows 8 Tablet and Phone Edition" or something.

Reply Parent Score: 3