Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 8th Sep 2012 11:58 UTC
Legal "While Apple's technology is a 'very nice invention', the technique used in Android differs from the iOS solution, argued Bas Berghuis van Woortman, one of Samsung's lawyers. Because the Android based method is more hierarchical the system is more complex and therefore harder for developers to use, he said. [...] Apple disagrees. 'They suggest that they have a lesser solution, but that is simply not true', said Apple's lawyer Theo Blomme to judge Peter Blok, who presided over a team of three judges, in a response to Samsung's claim." I just wish these companies and their lawyers could see and hear themselves. If only for a few seconds. Not even Monty Python could write this. By the way, all these patents were already thrown out last year by the Dutch courts, but Apple started a 'bottom procedure', a more thorough handling of the case. Three expert IP judges preside, and due to the earlier ruling, Apple is fighting an uphill battle.
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WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

You keep jumping from one claim to another every time I rebut them.

Hardly their fault that they put in a lot of effort to make their products look like Apple and launch a whole marketing campaign to promote these products?


That's not what I said. I said it's hardly their fault that people want what they want.

Also, you keep saying that their products look like Apple's ones like it was some sort of a universal fact, but well, as the saying goes the beauty is in the eye of the beholder: just yesterday I was looking at phones and I just do not see the resemblance between e.g SGS III and iPhone except that both have flat, rectangular screens.

I have seen their commercials regarding their Apple "inspired" products, but I haven't seen any regarding their Nokia/BlackBerry ones.


That I cannot help you with.

Reply Parent Score: 4

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

People want iPhones. That's why Google went from a Blackerry clone to an iOS one, that's why Samsung made TouchWiz and made their products look like Apple ones.

I don't think it's wrong to go with the flow and give people what they want, but Samsung went very far in their copying no matter how you try to spin or excuse it.

This probably hurt Nokia more than it did Apple. People are now used to mobile phones with an iOS type of interface. Nokia is different with WP. This will put a number of people off, because they think they won't understand it and prefer something they know they understand.

I just hope Nokia will get back in to the game so there will be true choice in the mobile phone world.

Reply Parent Score: 1

andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

People want iPhones. That's why Google went from a Blackerry clone to an iOS one, that's why Samsung made TouchWiz and made their products look like Apple ones.

I don't think it's wrong to go with the flow and give people what they want, but Samsung went very far in their copying no matter how you try to spin or excuse it.

This probably hurt Nokia more than it did Apple. People are now used to mobile phones with an iOS type of interface. Nokia is different with WP. This will put a number of people off, because they think they won't understand it and prefer something they know they understand.

I just hope Nokia will get back in to the game so there will be true choice in the mobile phone world.


You my friend are displaying deep ignorance of how the technology world works. Claiming that Google copied the Blackberry then the iPhone is clearly an example of abject ignorance of the tech industry. And someone reading OSnews should have much more sense that what you are displaying here. In the tech world we have a thing called "Form Factors" and different segments of the industry employs different types of form factors.
In the mobile segment you have half-screen devices such as Palm and Blackberry and full screen devices such as PocketPC and Iphone and others. Some devices have flip out keyboards while others do not. Your feeble claim that Google copied Blackberry first then Apple based on the form-factor of the device when the fact is Android was designed to span all form-factors is laughable at best. It makes me wonder if you are just chiming in from some public relations firm such as Burson-Marsteller. They have been quite active in forums and places like Slashdot lately spewing this same line of reasoning.

Reply Parent Score: 5

winter skies Member since:
2009-08-21


I just hope Nokia will get back in to the game so there will be true choice in the mobile phone world.


[Warning: I'm going slightly^W OT, sorry].
I hope so, too, but I can't see it coming in the near future. Nokia screwed up big time by alienating their existing customer base, which was used to many great features that have been thrown away along with some UI sluggishness when they moved to WP.
They switched to the platform that had the least in common with their previous offering - no doubt why they failed to convert a vast majority of users. They contributed some great added value (Maps, Drive) and WP would have been far less competitive without their offering.
But the inability to save SMS drafts, to have a standby screen, to use a phone as a mass storage device, to transfer files via Bluetooth, to manage internal storage and so on really sucks for those who enjoyed their old Nokias. They could mean nothing to others, but many of them already went with other platforms and making them switch back will be even harder.
Moving to such a different OS is too much of a change for the ones who grew up with Windows Mobile and Symbian - you could do whatever you wanted with them. Not because of the tiles - something Microsoft managed to do right - but because of everything else.
This is directed at Microsoft, too - while offering a fresh user experience in terms of interface design, they copied the Apple walled garden approach (no patent on that, unfortunately), even replicating the majority of its shortcomings - closed BT, lack of file management, even missing copy/paste features on the first version of WP.

If I had liked that approach I would have chosen Apple right away - I had stayed with both MS and Nokia because of the openness of their platforms. They're not a choice anymore for those who care about it. Linux-based efforts - Android, MeeGo/Nemo, WebOS, Tizen and such - are the natural haven for those who feel orphaned by Nokia.
If Nokia manage do get the WP platform some traction - and their hardware is really gorgeous btw - good for them, but if things don't change in the WP ecosystem they will need to build a completely new userbase - and that's not going to be easy at all.

[I get the feeling my English sounds very unnatural, if not downright wrong, so please bear with me.]

Reply Parent Score: 1