Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 9th Sep 2012 22:58 UTC
Mac OS X "A little more than an year ago I wrote my rant post The Linux Desktop Experience is Killing Linux on the Desktop and for the first time in 8 years I wasn't a desktop Linux user anymore. I spent about a month wrestling with Windows 7, but let's face it - Windows is ill suited for professional Ruby programmers like me (and it's ill suited for most programmers, except maybe Java & .Net I guess). Anyways, it was never my intention to stick with Windows - I was just doing my Mac due diligence. Now with 1+ year of OSX usage I'd like to share a few things about my experience thus far with you."
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One disadvantage of Mac OS X...
by rklrkl on Mon 10th Sep 2012 08:48 UTC
rklrkl
Member since:
2005-07-06

...is the sticker price shock you get. Whilst the cost of Mac OS X upgrades of the OS itself are sensible, the initial hardware price is not and "officially" (Hackintoshes aside) you aren't allowed to run Mac OS X on anything other than very, very expensive Apple kit. Here in the UK, the Apple store is ludicrously priced - about double the price for equivalent Windows-running hardware.

One of the major advantages Linux has, IMHO, is that it runs on virtually everything from embdedded systems, phones, tablets, DVRs/set top boxes, netbooks, laptops, desktops, servers and mainframes whereas Mac OS X and iOS only run on Apple hardware. It's reckoned in a few years, Android will overtake Windows as the world's #1 OS, so Linux will actually be the most popular OS in the world for the first time ever :-)

Reply Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Whilst the cost of Mac OS X upgrades of the OS itself are sensible, the initial hardware price is not

Well, the price of OSX development is specifically hidden also in hardware costs - low upfront price of upgrades is largely just a trick so that Apple is able to retire older versions quicker (which also forces a bit those who would prefer to not upgrade - 3rd party software tends to quickly abandon older version of Apple OS)

One of the major advantages Linux has, IMHO, is that it runs on virtually everything from embdedded systems, phones, tablets, DVRs/set top boxes, netbooks, laptops, desktops, servers and mainframes whereas Mac OS X and iOS only run on Apple hardware.

To be fair, Apple hardware covers most of those categories... (covered virtually all as long as Xserve were around; I think some people even made ~supercomputer clusters out of them; and remember that Linux doesn't really run natively on mainframes, they are built sort of around their own hypervisor, wits OSes running as a sort of virtual machines)
Though, curiously, Apple routers and/or NAS devices are running NetBSD, IIRC.

Edited 2012-09-17 00:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2