Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 9th Sep 2012 22:58 UTC
Mac OS X "A little more than an year ago I wrote my rant post The Linux Desktop Experience is Killing Linux on the Desktop and for the first time in 8 years I wasn't a desktop Linux user anymore. I spent about a month wrestling with Windows 7, but let's face it - Windows is ill suited for professional Ruby programmers like me (and it's ill suited for most programmers, except maybe Java & .Net I guess). Anyways, it was never my intention to stick with Windows - I was just doing my Mac due diligence. Now with 1+ year of OSX usage I'd like to share a few things about my experience thus far with you."
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Windows is ill suited...
by Dr.Mabuse on Tue 11th Sep 2012 03:28 UTC
Dr.Mabuse
Member since:
2009-05-19

"...for most programmers"

Sorry, what?

You can program just about anything through Windows, with a breath-taking array of tools (commercial and free) at your disposal.

I say this as a user of many platforms.

Please justify such a comment!

Reply Score: 3

RE: Windows is ill suited...
by rowdy on Tue 11th Sep 2012 06:23 in reply to "Windows is ill suited..."
rowdy Member since:
2009-11-30

" Windows is ill suited for most programmers"
...
Please justify such a comment!


There is a particular project I had the misfortune of having to build in Windows.

Tracking down and installing the required dependencies in Arch Linux was as simple as typing:

pacman -S git openal glew boost-libs freetype2 devil libvorbis sdl libxcursor curl shared-mime-info desktop-file-utils boost cmake zip xz p7zip python2 java-environment

git clone <project-url>


In Windows however, I had to search for, download, install and configure the dependencies one-by-one. What took 5 minutes in Linux took all day in Windows.

Also, Windows lacks a decent terminal emulator and text editor. It's fine if you like IDEs, but doesn't really support a vim+zsh style workflow.

Reply Parent Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Windows is no different than other commercial operating systems.

Linux is one of the few cases where package management real works nicely, assuming all you need for your work is available as package.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Dr.Mabuse Member since:
2009-05-19


Tracking down and installing the required dependencies in Arch Linux was as simple as typing:

pacman -S git openal glew boost-libs freetype2 devil libvorbis sdl libxcursor curl shared-mime-info desktop-file-utils boost cmake zip xz p7zip python2 java-environment

git clone


This is fair enough. It didn't really click with me that we were talking about open-source/free libraries when I read "ill-suited to most programmers."

I use Debian for many server-side projects and bringing in dependancies is equally as simple with apt-get.

In Windows however, I had to search for, download, install and configure the dependencies one-by-one. What took 5 minutes in Linux took all day in Windows.


I like to use MinGW myself, and I agree, it is a lot of work.

Also, Windows lacks a decent terminal emulator and text editor. It's fine if you like IDEs, but doesn't really support a vim+zsh style workflow.


Agreed.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Windows is ill suited...
by boldingd on Fri 14th Sep 2012 20:48 in reply to "RE: Windows is ill suited..."
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

That's exactly in line with my experiences as well. Getting set up for OpenGL development on Linux was as easy as "yum install a-bunch-of-devel-packages" and coming back in ten minutes. It took a couple of days to get everything squared away on Windows - although a large part of that was that I didn't know how the linker worked on Windows, and I had to figure that out.

To set thing up on Windows, I had to download the source for each library, load it in Visual C++ (and I got to deal with the fact that some of those libraries use old build systems that need to be adapted to VC 2010's build system, that don't always actually get imported correctly). After building them, I had to copy the resulting libraries and header directories into specific system directories to link them into my own project, and fiddle with the include and linker settings in VC.

I also got hit by a 32-bit/64-bit issue; it turns out that you have to copy 64-bit libraries to a different directory than 32-bit ones, and that getting a source check-out of a library that uses an old build system may or may not be buildable in 64-bit (and even when you can, you might have to go to war with VC Express to get it to actually happen). I never actually resolved that issue, but just gave up and built my code in 32-bit (on 64-bit windows 7, in 2011).

This question also actually came up in a talk I did about learning Ada a few days ago. When asked where to get an Ada compiler, I essentially said, "On linux, just type <package_manager> install gnat. On windows, you get to fuck with Cygwin."

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Windows is ill suited...
by zima on Sun 16th Sep 2012 23:31 in reply to "RE: Windows is ill suited..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Also, Windows lacks a decent terminal emulator and text editor. It's fine if you like IDEs, but doesn't really support a vim+zsh style workflow.

OTOH, that seems like perpetuating unproductive myths...
( http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Mouse_vs._keyboard/index.html & programming is not about typing)

Reply Parent Score: 2