Linked by fran on Tue 11th Sep 2012 19:26 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Bill Moggridge, the London-born industrial designer credited with creating the first laptop computer,died on Saturday aged 69 after a battle with cancer. Moggridge is best known as the creator of the GRiD Compass, a device which introduced many of the design traits used in modern laptops, including the hinged case, the flat display and the low-profile keyboard. Moggridge said that when he tested the device prototype in 1981, it was the first time he had used a computer."
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smashIt
Member since:
2005-07-06

as keeping a Lithium-Ion battery connected to the mains constantly at full charge will kill it dead, dead, dead before too long unless the inbuilt charging circuit is very, very good.


nowadays every midrange laptop should have no problem with this

except if it's form apple
those bastards even had the nerve to celebrate balanced battery-packs as something completely new

Reply Parent Score: 4

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

nowadays every midrange laptop should have no problem with this

except if it's form apple
those bastards even had the nerve to celebrate balanced battery-packs as something completely new

My sense of hardware history is failing me. Is this sarcasm or does every mid-range laptop actually have this feature nowadays ?

Reply Parent Score: 1

smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

haven't heard of a laptop that still is destroying it's batterie
on my thinkpad i can even set the threshold for charging myselfe

Reply Parent Score: 2

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

nowadays every midrange laptop should have no problem with this


Wrong. It's the biggest issue with any portable device. If you leave your laptop plugged in all day, you will *harm* you battery. Fact. Lithium ion batteries are prone to damage when two factors are reached:

1) being kept at 100% charge for prolonged periods without discharge (usual method for desktop use, plugged in to the charger all day.)
2) charge going below a specific threshold, usually somewhere between 1% and 6% of actual battery capacity (not necessarily what your OS reports as the current charge level.)

A good charge circuit will not keep the battery at 100%, but will allow it to slightly discharge within a threshold. Though this will still damage the battery if used for prolonged periods, but the risk is mitigated if the user simply charges the batter and then forgets to take it off charge when complete for a couple of hours. Lithium ion batteries just don't deal with being kept at full charge for prolonged periods as it screws with the electrolytes in the composition, causing oxidation and causing the capacity to diminish. (edit: this happens anyway, it just accelerates the issue..)

Lithium polymer are slightly different, but the general rules still apply. Lithium Polymer are slightly more hardy due to the lack of an organic electrolyte compound. Lithium Polymer are more just explosive ;-)

None of this is anecdotal. If you want anecdotes though, I have seen enough Laptops with dead batteries through prolonged desk use in my career to make me a believer.

Edited 2012-09-13 11:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

I think you are mixing up some things

a good charger in a laptop starts charging only when the battery is below a certain threshold and cuts the power to the battery after it has been charged an ballanced

and thats all you can do for the battery

everything else is normal ageing of the battery

sure cheap cells degrade faster than high-quality ones, but that still has nothing to do with the charger

Reply Parent Score: 3