Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Sep 2012 16:08 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "High Tech Computer (HTC) has grown up with Microsoft, from the old HTC-built iPAQ's running on Microsoft's Pocket PC operating system, to the Orange SPV - Microsoft's first Windows smartphone. The Taiwanese company has always been a loyal aid to the software giant, but lately that close relationship has started to feel a little dated. HTC's investment in Android and its Sense user interface has taken precedent over its initial work with Windows Mobile, and the company's Windows Phone flagships have been impressive, but overshadowed by Nokia's colorful Lumia range and partnership with Microsoft. That all appears to be changing though." HTC announced some good-looking Windows Phone 8 phones (ugh) today, but from my personal experience of owning several devices from both brands for over a decade, Nokia has the edge on quality. Good to see a serious commitment to WP8 though - we wouldn't want the Android dominance to continue.
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Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

What do you mean? My pictures, videos, documents, calendars, contacts, and notes are accessible from any device with a web browser thanks to the cloud.

My apps are synced across devices, and I can browse and install apps from any OS using just my browser. I don't understand where there is a lack of reach?

And yeah, I'm sure your developed behind closed doors, with closed binary drivers, and non standard Java bytecode is the pinnacle of open.

Please.

Reply Parent Score: 3

niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

You suggest a browser as a good alternative to something I should be able to see from my file manager of choice? God knows I want to be tethered to the net just to get at something usually sitting in my pocket. Right...

Cloud services are not an acceptable solution for me, or for many others. If you can't see why a cloud-only solution is a hindrance, I guess that's where our conversation has to end, at least on that topic. Different strokes for different folks, and all that.

And for the record, I'm not granting Google some magical title of "completely open". I'm just picking the lesser of two evils because they still allow some semblance of user control over their own freaking devices.

Personally, I don't find ANY current smartphone OS acceptable in regards to openness.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

My point is that there are varying degrees of openness out there. I don't think Android is anything near a poster child for it. Things are open in different ways.

Besides, I don't think its unreasonable to expect someone to have an internet connection.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Nelson,

"What do you mean? My pictures, videos, documents, calendars, contacts, and notes are accessible from any device with a web browser thanks to the cloud. My apps are synced across devices, and I can browse and install apps from any OS using just my browser. I don't understand where there is a lack of reach?"


I did a double take when you said this. Not to cause a ruckus, but out of genuine interest why the sudden change of heart over the legitimacy of having web apps instead of native ones? Is my sarcasm detector broken?

http://www.osnews.com/thread?534990

Nelson: "[Javascript is] barely palatable on the web, do not push it into the app space where there are much higher expectations. People have come to expect the web to be a sub optimal experience."

http://www.osnews.com/thread?535005

Nelson: "...the argument is that JS+HTML is god awful choice for app development."

Nelson: "On the web, I'm cool with JS and HTML. Let the web be the web. But for Christ's sake, let apps be apps."


http://www.osnews.com/thread?535333

Nelson: "Also, my apps feel more native, perform better, and I achive comparable productivity with just slapping together an alien feeling HTML5 website and calling it a day by stuffing it into an app."

Reply Parent Score: 6

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

You're so ridiculous its almost clinical.

I specifically, continuously, and very explicitly limited the scope of those remarks to app development.

Accessing and exporting your website from the cloud does not fall under such criteria.

I understand, you're bitter I called you a bad developer, but its no excuse to jump off the proverbial deep end.

Edit: Again, your knee jerk nature and lack of temperament shows.

Web app is very ambiguous term, and again, is not at all what I spoke of in the other thread. I specifically called out taking HTML/JS, packing them up in a native code container, and selling it on an App Store as a native app. Prime enabling frameworks of this are Phone Gap.

Web apps on the web are fine. People expect them to walk and talk like the web.

Your comment above is intellectually dishonest and beneath you.

Edited 2012-09-19 20:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

judgen Member since:
2006-07-12

Define the cloud.
Noone has said what it means, but microsoft and apple is pursuing the cloud 2.0 now. Oracle had it right in my mind. Web2.0, cloud and more is just services and providers. Pointless naming shit.

Reply Parent Score: 1