Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 22nd Sep 2012 22:07 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Ubuntu 12.10 will include advertisements for products on Amazon. It will look like this - if you search, product suggestions will pop up. This seems like a rather slippery slope to me, and I certainly wouldn't want this on my desktop, laptop, smartphone, tablet, or anywhere else. On the web - fine, I'm on your site, not mine - but my desktop is mine, and mine alone. Not that it matters - open source, someone will disable them. Biggest concern: does this mean my search queries get sent across the web?
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RE: It's just a lens
by UltraZelda64 on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 01:07 UTC in reply to "It's just a lens"
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

Don't install what? Ubuntu or the lens? Not installing Ubuntu is certainly possible, but this "lens" will probably be installed by default with the OS. Otherwise, how else would they be able to get those kickbacks from Amazon, sending all of everyone's HUD searches to Amazon while they're at it? If that's the case, then you can only uninstall it after it has already been installed. It's easier to just install one of the many other Linux distributions--and IMO, preferably one that is not based directly on Ubuntu.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: It's just a lens
by bassbeast on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 03:00 in reply to "RE: It's just a lens"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

I have to say I find the whole thing fascinating myself. I mean here is the company that the community gushed over, now when they are bleeding to death and trying to keep the lights on its "ZOMG they are trying to make money! How dare they not do everything for free, i'll switch OSes first!" Wharrgarbl!

I guess like communism the whole FOSS philosophy just don't work, at least on the desktop. As i have said before it will take at least 100 million dollars to bring Linux up to the same level as Windows and OSX, you have whole subsystems like X and Pulse that will need to be replaced or rebuilt, docs, regression testing, QA and QC, yet as Canonical found out there is simply no way to make money on a Linux desktop. How many "Ubuntu derived" distros are there, enjoying the fruits of Canonical labor without throwing them even a beer? I rest my case.

The big mistake Shuttleworth made was using Linux in the first place, if he'd have used BSD as Jobs did he could have kept his work, charged $20 a pop once the buzz built up and would now have the money to not only continue but actually improve the system. Instead we'll see Canonical join Mandriva, Xandros, Linsprie and the rest on the scrapheap of history and nothing will ever get any better. Different and prettier yes, but NOT better. Heck you can't even update the system without Pulse or WiFi or something breaking, this is 2012 and Linux behaves like its 1993 when it comes to drivers, that just won't cut it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by UltraZelda64 on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 03:37 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

I have to say I find the whole thing fascinating myself. I mean here is the company that the community gushed over, now when they are bleeding to death and trying to keep the lights on its "ZOMG they are trying to make money! How dare they not do everything for free, i'll switch OSes first!" Wharrgarbl!

I have to admit, I never did get the big deal with Ubuntu back in those days. I kept trying it, version after version, trying to figure out what the big deal was with no success. And later on, for a while they started to do the right things, so it was interesting--but it was still just Debian, only with an installable live CD, more up-to-date applications, a custom theme, less stability, and the commercial backing of a billionaire.

I despised advertising back then, and I despise advertising now. For me, nothing's changed. Hell, I only used Ubuntu for a brief time, mostly back in 2008. Back when it really was starting to get good. Before and shortly after then, as well as now, I was and have been using something else.

How many "Ubuntu derived" distros are there, enjoying the fruits of Canonical labor without throwing them even a beer? I rest my case.

You make that seem like a bad thing, but Canonical itself seems to be enjoying it. Most recent example: Lubuntu.

The big mistake Shuttleworth made was using Linux in the first place, if he'd have used BSD as Jobs did he could have kept his work, charged $20 a pop once the buzz built up and would now have the money to not only continue but actually improve the system.

Yes, because we all want another god damn proprietary operating system.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by Gullible Jones on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 04:07 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

FOSS works fine on the desktop for single applications, or IMO even software collections like the GNU userland. What it doesn't work fine with is a huge agglomeration of software produced by different developers with vastly different ideas of what's sensible.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by TM99 on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 04:13 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
TM99 Member since:
2012-08-26

No, what the Linux community was impressed with initially was the fact that an African millionaire decided to produce a Debian Linux spin-off that would be available for 2nd and 3rd World countries.

Ubuntu, the distro, however, is not Canonical, the corporation. Shuttleworth is independently wealthy and annual revenues for their services still nets them around $30 million. No that is not Apple, but it is hardly bleeding out and struggling to keep the lights on.

FOSS and Linux are not the same as 'corporate capitalism' though they are hardly 'communistic' in opposition to it. But you obviously confuse the two numerous times in this post. Most complaints these days about Ubuntu and Canonical are that they do not know how to separate the two either.

For example, Ubuntu's insistence on using Unity and now adding by default (i.e., I must opt-out not opt-in) integrated Amazon search are two examples of this inappropriate fusing of two radically different philosophies where both become watered down. Freedom is removed from Ubuntu, and Canonical is still not the African Apple or Microsoft.

If they want to be financially more successful, they could learn a thing or two from the market segment leaders like IBM, Red Hat, etc. Red Hat and Fedora keep and maintain this separation. If Fedora wants to be bleeding edge and do something stupid like adding Gnome 3, then they can. If it is a screw-up, someone will fork it, maintain Gnome 2, etc. Red Hat's corporate Linux is very conservative and maintains stability for long-term business customers and thereby provides them a much more stable and growing revenue stream. After all, RHEL versions 4, 5 & 6 ship with Gnome 2.8, 2.16, & 2.28 respectively.

Shuttleworth made his millions in the 'dot-com' high as a venture capitalist. He is a 'personality' and not necessarily the best person to run a successful long-term corporate entity in the 'Linux' world.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by Gullible Jones on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 04:25 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

BTW, have you ever tried Solaris for x86? It's proprietary (again) but freeware for personal use. Oracle probably puts a lot of effort into QC for it, and it has several advantages Linux (like being much more secure by default than 90% of distros last I checked). Honestly no idea what it's like on the desktop though, or what sort of hardware support it has.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by a2d23 on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 07:04 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
a2d23 Member since:
2012-05-22

Yes and nobody would have buy it. And you forget that the community is helping a lot in the bug finding fixing and quality control which you have to do yourself in a proprietary system. Everybody seems to forget that apple was struggling before 5-6 years ago before they came up with the iphone. I am not saying you can make money on the desktop but it's not the model problem.
And no search on my desktop lens not seem so disruptive. I can live with that.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by marcp on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 09:57 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

Oh, come one ... what "fruits of Canonical labour"? are you being serious? Just install Debian and you'll see that Ubuntu is exactly the same as Debian, not mentioning some silly stuff like upstart or Unity which Canonical developed.
They are rather a parasite, and your analogy to communism is highly inappropiate. I know USA has a century-isuess with mythical communism, but come-on!
FLOSS development model is working great and it is benefits both individuals and corporations. There is NO "communism" [BTW - you would be more accurate if you would have say "socialism"] there. There's something you won't understand as long as you're sticking to anarchocapitalistic terms of life - this "something" is kindness, selflessness and altruism.

But yeah, go ahead and buy yourself some sincere sympathy.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by v_bobok on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 10:48 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

I guess like communism the whole FOSS philosophy just don't work, at least on the desktop

It's time to stop posting, buddy, if you don't want to look embarrassing even more.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by No it isnt on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 11:36 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Uhm, if Shuttleworth had made Ubuntu a closed source fork of *BSD, he wouldn't have had much hype, and he would have had to put in significant resources to get various drivers (most notably for graphics) close to Linux's level. FreeBSD is currently years behind Linux as a desktop OS, for the simple reason that Linux is what all the desktop work goes in to. For your imaginary closed *BSD Ubuntu to get close to Windows, you would have to multiply your imaginary 100 million dollars with a real number higher than 1.

And despite the fact that no one seems to make much money off the Linux desktop (nor BSD), it strangely does seem to work rather well.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by windowshasyou on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 14:41 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
windowshasyou Member since:
2011-05-14

"Instead we'll see Canonical join Mandriva, Xandros, Linsprie and the rest on the scrapheap of history"

Don't taunt me. I'd love nothing better than to see Ubuntu and Arch go that route.

Edited 2012-09-23 14:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: It's just a lens
by r_a_trip on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 18:16 in reply to "RE[2]: It's just a lens"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

They could have just asked their users for donations to keep the train rolling. That is working fine for Mint.

Then again, Canonical pretends to be a business and not a millionaires plaything, so selling users to Amazon is more business like...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: It's just a lens
by fengshaun on Sun 23rd Sep 2012 05:01 in reply to "RE: It's just a lens"
fengshaun Member since:
2010-01-18

Don't install the lens. It's not embedded in Ubuntu itself.

Reply Parent Score: 1