Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 30th Sep 2012 19:13 UTC, submitted by Beket_
Slackware, Slax "Slackware 14.0 brings many updates and enhancements, among which you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: Xfce 4.10.0, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 4.8.5, a recent stable release of the 4.8.x series of the award-winning KDE desktop environment. [...] Slackware uses the 3.2.29 kernel bringing you advanced performance features such as journaling filesystems, SCSI and ATA RAID volume support, SATA support, Software RAID, LVM (the Logical Volume Manager), and encrypted filesystems. Kernel support for X DRI (the Direct Rendering Interface) brings high-speed hardware accelerated 3D graphics to Linux."
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RE[3]: Comment by Sodki
by JoshuaS on Sun 30th Sep 2012 20:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Sodki"
JoshuaS
Member since:
2011-09-15

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by Sodki
by VenomousGecko on Sun 30th Sep 2012 20:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Sodki"
VenomousGecko Member since:
2005-07-06

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )


In my opinion, you had the right idea with the second part of your comment. I think that using Slackware to learn Linux IS a great benefit over other distros. Also, as a Slackware user on a server, I find I am able to strip it down to the bare essentials easier than other distributions. The ability to install only what you need without much worry about having to fulfill dependencies is refreshing.

It all depends on what you are looking for, however, to determine if the above should be viewed as benefits.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Sun 30th Sep 2012 22:29 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Sodki"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

I think that using Slackware to learn Linux IS a great benefit over other distros.


All distros are good for learning and depending on what you want to do, you have to get your hands dirty sometimes. I love Gentoo, I like Debian and I don't enjoy Fedora and it's derivatives, but as a sysadmin I have to know how to configure and maintain a CentOS system, for example, because it's a professional advantage. The same goes for Ubuntu, since Ubuntu server LTS has a really nice support timeline.


Also, as a Slackware user on a server, I find I am able to strip it down to the bare essentials easier than other distributions. The ability to install only what you need without much worry about having to fulfill dependencies is refreshing.


The same can be said of Gentoo, Debian and Fedora, with the added bonus of having a really mature package manager that is "Internet aware" and "update ready". I understand that nowadays slackpkg comes with Slackware by default, but still it feels clunky.

Like I said before, I'm glad that Slackware is still around and I'm glad that there are people still using it, but unfortunately I can only see it as a somewhat broken toy that will never go beyond that. Sure, we can play with it, sure it can be fun, but you're better off spending your time with a proper (this is very subjective) operating system.

Edited 2012-09-30 22:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Sun 30th Sep 2012 22:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Sodki"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )


You're right, you can learn a lot of things. I did, especially when trying stuff that clearly wasn't designed for Slackware. But I (cautiously) disagree with the "pure Linux" statement. As far as I recall, Slackware had it's own file system hierarchy, which made things funkier to deal at times. Feel free to slap me if I'm wrong. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Sodki
by JoshuaS on Mon 1st Oct 2012 18:26 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Sodki"
JoshuaS Member since:
2011-09-15

Well, file system hierarchy is a giant mess on about any Linux-dstro, and IMHO a good admin will ALWAYS use a command to find a configuration file in his scripts, instead of hardcording path. So I don't see it as a downside.

Hey, to each his own, though. The only thing people should slap are basses :-)

Reply Parent Score: 1