Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 1st Oct 2012 22:55 UTC
General Development "Everyone seems to have a replacement for JavaScript - Google even has two. Now Microsoft has revealed that Anders Hejlsberg has been working on a replacement and it has released a preview of TypeScript. TypeScript is open source - Apache 2.0 license - and a superset of JavaScript. As you would expect from a Hejlsberg language it incorporates type checking, interfaces and lots of syntactic sugar."
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moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

That is why after a decade in the trenches trying to bend the browsers to do stuff they were never intended to do, I have switched my mind and now state if you want an application, make it native.

As it should be in first place, browsers are for documents.

Cool startups like to say how the web is the future, but they never have to discuss layout issues or look-and-feel, of browser behaviour vs OS defined guidelines, to get the customer to pay the project.

Or browser performance vs native performance for that matter.

In the end, applications should be done native. Easiness of installation can be achieved with things like ClickOnce, Java Web Start, or simple package repository.

Reply Parent Score: 8

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

moondevil,

"In the end, applications should be done native. Easiness of installation can be achieved with things like ClickOnce, Java Web Start, or simple package repository."

I hear you, three cheers for easy distribution of native apps. There are many kinds of apps for which browser based solutions aren't nearly as good. But many modern platforms are forcing us (devs/users) to make a contrived choice: submitting to and empowering corporately imposed walled gardens, or standing up for our freedom with (thus far unregulated) web apps. Given this choice, I'd go for freedom almost every time.

JWS was an excellent model for what mobile apps should have been; native apps which are as easy as using a website. However this possibility is largely being foiled by mobile manufacturers who are willing and able to promote platforms that enforce themselves as native application middle-men. This way they can collect royalties over 3rd party apps which they couldn't do if things like JWS were allowed.

Edited 2012-10-02 06:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

While I don't like the walled gardens of the mobile platforms, they are not new to me.

This is how the games industry works since the famous crash in 1982.

But you're right, if we don't stand against it, we might end in a scenario where all computing devices look like games consoles. Where only a few overlords are allowed to develop software.

Reply Parent Score: 4