Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 5th Oct 2012 10:45 UTC
Apple Beautiful video tribute and written message from Tim Cook regarding Steve Jobs, who passed away one year ago today.
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RE: Comment by gan17
by tracul on Fri 5th Oct 2012 22:30 UTC in reply to "Comment by gan17"
tracul
Member since:
2011-08-21

Exactly. It bothered me a year ago and it bothers me now. How lots of people went (an still go) on about Steve Jobs and not a word about Dennis Ritchie.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by gan17
by MOS6510 on Sat 6th Oct 2012 06:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by gan17"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

You can make a huge list of important people, inventors, scientists, explorers, painters, etc... but most people will only recognize the likes of Brad Pitt, Rihanna (who has at least 10 US number one hits vs 0 for Depeche Mode, go figure) or the current boy band.

Would anyone recognize Nikola Tesla? Or Isaac Newton? Or even heard of them or what they did?

Dennis Ritchie earned his place in history, but he wasn't in a boy band. Nor was Steve Jobs, but he got much more media attention during his live and lots of people use Apple products and while Steve was in charge Apple and Steve were basically the same thing.

Mention Ritchie and people don't know him. Mention C and it still doesn't ring a bell (pun intended), mention UNIX and some people may ask if that wasn't something like DOS where you had to type stuff.

More people know what Britney Spears had for breakfast than people know Dennis Ritchie.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by gan17
by M.Onty on Sat 6th Oct 2012 09:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by gan17"
M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23


Would anyone recognize Nikola Tesla? Or Isaac Newton? Or even heard of them or what they did?


I think most people would have a fair idea of what Isaac Newton did, and might even recognise his portrait. That distinctive barnet and sour expression ...

But your general point is valid. People's fame and adoration are not dependent of a fair measurement of their technical achievements.

One of Jobs' greatest achievements (besides the Apple II and the Mac and all that, you know, computery stuff) is the fabled Reality Distortion Field. An excessively long and hysterical period of mourning only adds to the RDF, increasing the total sum of his achievements and thereby validating the excessively long and hysterical period of mourning.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by gan17
by TM99 on Sat 6th Oct 2012 13:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by gan17"
TM99 Member since:
2012-08-26

And right here is why this excessive worship of all things Steve is ultimately ridiculous.

History remembers Tesla and Newton. They truly impacted culture and society. They advanced the human race.

In the future it will be Ritchie and Woz who are remembered. Jobs will be like Brittany Spears and Brad Pitt. No one will remember nor should they.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by gan17
by mkone on Sun 7th Oct 2012 20:31 in reply to "RE: Comment by gan17"
mkone Member since:
2006-03-14

Why does it bother you? That is a rather odd attitude to have to people celebrating the life of someone who was successful in his chosen field, and did a lot to push computing industry to where it is today.

The only reason this would bother you is if you have what is bordering on an irrational dislike of Steve Jobs to the point that other people praising him offends you, or rather your sense of "fairness".

Steve Jobs was more well known that Dennis Ritchie, more people knew him and what he was about. Dennis Ritchie chose a life away from the limelight, therefore he is less well known than Jobs. There is no inherent unfairness about this. It doesn't diminish his achievements the least bit.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Comment by gan17
by TM99 on Mon 8th Oct 2012 04:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by gan17"
TM99 Member since:
2012-08-26

This isn't about 'fairness', this is about the glorification of the sociopath.

Americans today 'worship' the sociopaths, the narcissists, and the 'bad guys & gals'.

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/07/why-dont-the-psychopaths-on-...

What men like Jobs did to the financial sector is happening in technology as well. Yes, Page & Gates also fit this psychological description, however, they are not 'popular'. Their companies do not hold the popular appeal that Apple now does. Apple has also now become another company too big to fail. If it does, it literally would impact the American economy. There may be hope with these lawsuits if Apple loses either on appeal or another patent suit. There may be hope if Cook continues to 'act' human like his recent apology about the map app. Jobs would NEVER have done that.

As part of my professional work, I deal with the effects of the human psychology on business and the effects of business on the human psychology.

So this is why I am concerned. It affects us all when men like Jobs are worshiped and men like Ritchie are forgotten. It is supremely rational to not like the unlikeable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by gan17
by zima on Fri 12th Oct 2012 23:58 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by gan17"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

That is a rather odd attitude to have to people celebrating the life of someone who was successful in his chosen field, and did a lot to push computing industry to where it is today.

Push where computing industry is today? Surely you must mean stifling progress by launching Patent World War?...

Or maybe the overall and quite overt goal of barring "lesser people" - vast majority of human population - from technology advancements? (Apple openly aims to target only the few most profitable % of human population; Apple also openly acts to block other manufacturers from using any supposed innovation brought by Apple; bringing those two to their logical synthesis...)

Reply Parent Score: 2