Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Oct 2012 01:44 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Mozilla & Gecko clones "Just under a month ago I wrote a personal post about my thoughts on Firefox OS and why I think there is something 'magical' about what it stands for and the possibilities it brings to the table. This post is a follow-up that aims to cover much of the same ground but with extra detail and more of a technical focus."
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Member since:
2009-06-20

When the answer to "why?" is "because HTML5", I know that this happened because engineering was looking for a problem to match an existing solution.

FirefoxOS's use of HTML5 is not a solution looking for a problem, it is a solution to a known problem: HTML5 webpages/webapps are slow in iOS and Android browser. They are sub-par compared to native apps.

And I thought it would always be the case, whatever double-core A6 and 22-nm Exynos processor we would throw behind, until FirefoxOS came and proved this belief was wrong. A barebones OS with a good rendering engine on top can do the trick.

And am rather glad the Mozilla Foudation is doing it and pushing it seriously.

Reply Parent Score: 4

crystall Member since:
2007-02-06

FirefoxOS's use of HTML5 is not a solution looking for a problem, it is a solution to a known problem: HTML5 webpages/webapps are slow in iOS and Android browser. They are sub-par compared to native apps.


I'm working on the project and I must say that one of its biggest upsides is that it puts a lot of pressure on delivering top-notch performance from fairly limited hardware.

The large optimization and tuning effort required will deliver within Firefox too (the codebase is shared) and generally should raise the bar on what kind of responsiveness and performance users will expect from web pages in general.

Reply Parent Score: 5

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Here's hoping it does translate into performance increases in mobile versions of Firefox. Right now, it's about the slowest app on my phone (Sony Ericsson Xperia Pro); even Google Earth is smoother.

Firefox has been getting better/smoother with each release. But it's still not up to par with Opera Mobile on a single-core 1 GHz CPU with two-year-old GPU.

Reply Parent Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

one of its biggest upsides is that it puts a lot of pressure on delivering top-notch performance from fairly limited hardware.

The large optimization and tuning effort required will deliver within Firefox too (the codebase is shared) and generally should raise the bar on what kind of responsiveness and performance users will expect from web pages in general.

Funny, this coming from Mozilla, which aborted two earlier mobile efforts while essentially saying "we'll just wait for more powerful hardware" - meanwhile, Webkit & Opera took over mobile (when they deliver more than enough perf, or better than FF in the experience of me and many; for other "more HTML5-like" stuff, there are apps)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

FirefoxOS's use of HTML5 is not a solution looking for a problem, it is a solution to a known problem: HTML5 webpages/webapps are slow in iOS and Android browser. They are sub-par compared to native apps.


But you see, the goal of these other mobile platforms (iOS, Android, Windows Phone, etc.) is not to enable great HTML5 apps. The goal is simply to enable great apps.

Edited 2012-10-11 12:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Mrokii Member since:
2011-01-04

Exactly. I don't see why they'd even want to implement all these Html5-abilities, simply because it would bring regular Webapps closer to their native apps.

Reply Parent Score: 2

dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

If the only result of FFOS would be sufficient and validated in a real world set of JS APIs that are standard and that Apple and Google must implement (preserving FFOS performance) then the project can be considered a success.

I see an unobvious ally to what FF guys are trying to do: Microsoft.
Having an web view engine that is order of magnitude faster that competition would prompt web devs to finally give the platform some love.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Mrokii Member since:
2011-01-04

If the only result of FFOS would be sufficient and validated in a real world set of JS APIs that are standard and that Apple and Google must implement (preserving FFOS performance) then the project can be considered a success.


Which isn't going to happen, imho. They can't be forced to do that.

Reply Parent Score: 2