Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 10th Oct 2012 22:37 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Donating to software projects - or, more accurately, open source projects. It's hardly new, it's hardly rare, and I'm sure most of us have donated at some point. That's probably why Canonical has opened Ubuntu up for donations - but with a twist.
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RE[2]: Not donating to distros.
by spiderman on Thu 11th Oct 2012 09:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Not donating to distros."
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

No, that is not what I am saying.
I do roll my LFS distro BTW but that does not matter to the point.
The effort of packaging IS worthy.
What I'm saying is that:
The packaging is the final step. You have to take into account all the effort and weight it. When you buy a commercial operating system like Windows for $100/year, something like $1 goes to the packaging an 99$ goes to development. With free software, the opposite is happening.
The effort required to package the software into a distro is relatively easy when compared to develop the software, espicially since the developers use autotools and even go as far as providing rpm spec files and stuff. Look at all the Debian spins. Sometimes, it's just a new wallpaper and some software selection.
Ubuntu is about Unity and the community. They put some real efforts in developing the community. They is worth something but don't forget the montain they sit on. The software they use is worth a lot, starting with Debian and GNU.

Reply Parent Score: 5

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

The effort required to package the software into a distro is relatively easy when compared to develop the software, espicially since the developers use autotools and even go as far as providing rpm spec files and stuff. Look at all the Debian spins. Sometimes, it's just a new wallpaper and some software selection.


This is one of the reasons Linux distributions have failed in the desktop for normal users.

You need more than just pack a set of .rpms with an install script into a CD.

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

The failure is 100% dependant on the goals.
I believe Mandrake/Mandriva/Mageia is a success as they made the GNU/Linux/KDE stack work in a usable and integrated fashion with urpmi and MCC and random people can use it without deep knowledge and tweaking.
Ubuntu is a success as they made millions of people aware of GNU.
You should donate to projects you value the most. If your goal is to improve the user experience, donate ro upstream projects. If your goal is to improve visibility and knowledge of free software, donate to Ubuntu. If your goal is both, donate a little to each. And if you just don't care about it, donate to the red cross or whatever.

Edited 2012-10-11 12:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

When you buy a commercial operating system like Windows for $100/year, something like $1 goes to the packaging an 99$ goes to development.


I believe more than $50 goes to advertisement. A lot less goes to actual development.

Reply Parent Score: 4