Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 10th Oct 2012 22:37 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Donating to software projects - or, more accurately, open source projects. It's hardly new, it's hardly rare, and I'm sure most of us have donated at some point. That's probably why Canonical has opened Ubuntu up for donations - but with a twist.
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RE[5]: My Opinion is is Mine.
by r_a_trip on Fri 12th Oct 2012 13:38 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: My Opinion is is Mine."
r_a_trip
Member since:
2005-07-06

The fragmentation is not in the number of Distro's. All distributions are in essence (re)packaging of upstream code (in that sense there is only minimal duplication of effort). They are all source compatible.

The fragmentation sits at the library level. There is no common target base, but this is a failure in consensus and collaboration, not in the number of distro's. Of course killing all distro's but one would solve this problem instantly (nobody is confused about the direction under a dictator), but it would also destroy the beneficial variety in the distro ecosphere.

That Linux doesn't make significant inroads when MS falters, isn't because e.g. Ubuntu isn't ready for the desktop. It's because Linux isn't used to push affordable and believable desktop systems to the consumer. There are a few vendors like ZaReason, System76 with halfway comparable systems to Windows machines, but you also pay a premium for them. Then we have some small community projects like KDE's vivaldi tablet or Linux Mint's mintBox.

The systems of dedicated sellers like ZaReason and System76 are overpriced from a consumer perspective. The smaller community projects have the right idea with smaller, more affordable machines, but they don't have reach.

If a systems manufacturer/vendor could produce something like a mintBox, be it x86 or ARM based, complete with a (modest) screen and mouse + keyboard for an affordable price and push this in the market as the affordable, hassle free Everyman's PC, I think it could have a shot. But it would need to be marketed right and the vendor should have a long term plan.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: My Opinion is is Mine.
by ilovebeer on Fri 12th Oct 2012 17:08 in reply to "RE[5]: My Opinion is is Mine."
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

If a systems manufacturer/vendor could produce something like a mintBox, be it x86 or ARM based, complete with a (modest) screen and mouse + keyboard for an affordable price and push this in the market as the affordable, hassle free Everyman's PC, I think it could have a shot. But it would need to be marketed right and the vendor should have a long term plan.

You stopped describing linux as soon as you said "hassle free everyman's pc". That is not what linux is in most cases, especially for people new to linux. There's always a steady flow of users trying to fix something that broke either seemingly by itself or via "updating". I'm not saying anything new though. Why linux isn't successful as a desktop, and why it's not even close to being ready to be has been discussed to death many times over. The linux desktop continues to be in the same old rut and we continue to have the exact same conversation about it. And that will probably continue to be true for the foreseeable future. future.

Reply Parent Score: 1