Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Oct 2012 15:47 UTC
Windows Casey Muratori dissects the consequences of Windows 8's closed distribution model. "But how realistic is the assumption that the Windows desktop will still be a usable computing platform in the future? And what would be the consequences were it to disappear, leaving Windows users with only the closed software ecosystem introduced in Windows 8? To answer these questions, this volume of Critical Detail examines the immediate and future effects of Microsoft's current certification requirements, explores in depth what history predicts for the lifespan of the classic Windows desktop, and takes a pragmatic look at whether an open or closed ecosystem would be better for Microsoft as a company." The section that details how none - none - of this year's greatest games (or last year's fantastic Skyrim) and only one of this year's Emmy-nominated TV shows pass Microsoft's rules sent chills down my spine.
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RE: ReactOS
by Laurence on Tue 16th Oct 2012 16:16 UTC in reply to "ReactOS"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

I'd very much love ReactOS to become a viable competitor to Windows, but sadly I can't see how that could ever happen as the ReactOS guys are chasing a moving target and with fewer resources too. Not to mention that it's harder to reverse engineer APIs than it is to design them from scratch.

And lets be honest, even the ReactOS devs managed to defy all odds and release a stable, production-ready OS. Microsoft would just sue the project into oblivion (it's impossible to write a clone without trespassing on some design patents).

Realistically I think we only have two options if we want an open platform:
1/ either push developers into supporting Linux, users on to Linux, and Linux distribution developers into making the switch over less painful.

2/ or campaign for governments to step in, preventing Microsoft from closing their platform. Given the scope of Windows, there maybe an anti-competitive argument to be made.

Personally I think both of those options stink.
1/ As a full time Linux user myself, I respect that some people prefer Windows because it's Windows. If they wanted to run Linux then like already would be doing so. So forcing them onto a platform they don't want to run isn't much better than forcing them into a closed ecosystem they didn't want to be part of.

2/ The moment you're relying on the government to competition, then you've already lost. Particularly if the government in question belongs to the US.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: ReactOS
by Chrispynutt on Tue 16th Oct 2012 16:19 in reply to "RE: ReactOS"
Chrispynutt Member since:
2012-03-14

As an ex Amiga user I am used to working with the least worst option in order to have a future and do things.

If Linux by default becomes that least worst option then I will move to Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: ReactOS
by TemporalBeing on Tue 16th Oct 2012 17:15 in reply to "RE: ReactOS"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

And lets be honest, even the ReactOS devs managed to defy all odds and release a stable, production-ready OS. Microsoft would just sue the project into oblivion (it's impossible to write a clone without trespassing on some design patents).


And that is why ReactOS is based in Russia...though Microsoft might just employ the Russian Mafia instead...

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: ReactOS
by theARE on Tue 16th Oct 2012 17:43 in reply to "RE: ReactOS"
theARE Member since:
2006-11-30

Certainly chasing a moving target hasnt helped, but if Windows 7 is to be the last 'good' windows, then the task becomes a little easier as they would no longer need to chase beyond that point.

Still a daunting task I'm sure, but their goal always was.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ReactOS
by Lennie on Wed 17th Oct 2012 00:58 in reply to "RE: ReactOS"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Why do you think it is a moving target ?

It seems Microsoft wants this RT and .Net universe or whatever it is.

That means Win32 is legacy, but that also means development on that API has pretty much stopped.

Thus it isn't a moving target anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: ReactOS
by moondevil on Wed 17th Oct 2012 08:19 in reply to "RE[2]: ReactOS"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I for one am looking forward to Win32 becoming legacy and say goodbye to Hungarian notation (which Microsoft nowadays admits it was an error to make use of).

If that really becomes true, and Windows Runtime becomes available for desktop applications as well, that would mean that C++ would be the only way to do native applications with Microsoft Languages.

Adding to that, Microsoft's stance on C support, this means C is pretty much dead on Windows, at least from Microsoft's point of view.

Looking to the past, they may take as many years as they took to get rid of MS-DOS, CP/M, Win16, Win32s APIs though.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ReactOS
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 17th Oct 2012 16:28 in reply to "RE: ReactOS"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

And lets be honest, even the ReactOS devs managed to defy all odds and release a stable, production-ready OS. Microsoft would just sue the project into oblivion (it's impossible to write a clone without trespassing on some design patents).

That's a pretty grim potential future outcome, but if that happened, couldn't the ReactOS project take the LAME stance? As in, "we're providing instructions (source code) on how to make something... we're not providing any actual patent-infringing software?" It might take a long time to compile and be an annoyance, but they could provide some package that automatically takes the code and builds it and then generates an ISO with it...

Okay, probably overkill, and maybe it wouldn't work across operating systems unless a compiler and iso generator (ie. for Windows) is provided too, and in general it would be a major pain in the ass... but it'd be an interesting solution. One or more scripts would automatically compile and then make an ISO file. It'd be interesting, but probably not very effective (especially at getting the OS to the masses).

But the real solution, I think, would be to get every single ReactOS mirror the hell out of the United States and into a country where such ridiculous laws don't exist anyway. Then, those people from other countries where patents don't apply, they still get to download and use the OS and it doesn't die. Meanwhile, those people in "restricted" areas can choose whether or not they want to break some stupid little law or not.

Edited 2012-10-17 16:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2