Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Oct 2012 10:56 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Things ain't going well for Nokia. Their quarterly results are - again - a disaster, and Lumia sales have dropped 28% (50% if you look at just the US). Windows Phone 8 is really going to be a make-it-or-break-it kind of thing. If it doesn't go well, the company might consider going back to focussing on rubber boots.
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Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Thu 18th Oct 2012 11:31 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Anyone who really wants a Lumia won't buy one until the ones running WP8 arrive.

It's the Osborne effect I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect

Reply Score: 12

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by BushLin on Thu 18th Oct 2012 15:02 in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

Come on... let's call it what it is: The Elop effect (Osborne effect + Ratner effect)
;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Thu 18th Oct 2012 15:22 in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I knew about Osborne, but after I posted the Wikipedia link I noticed Elop gets mentioned at the end. Hum, Elop and "the end". They do seem like a nice match.

Still it's hard to imagine Nokia going from #1 to going bust in just a few years.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by drcouzelis on Thu 18th Oct 2012 18:11 in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
drcouzelis Member since:
2010-01-11

Anyone who really wants a Lumia won't buy one until the ones running WP8 arrive.

I was thinking recently: Will Microsoft replace Windows Phone 8 with Windows 8 RT? Will they have another "no more updates for current phones" mobile OS restart?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by Nelson on Fri 19th Oct 2012 06:10 in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

It is largely already Windows 8 under the hood. They share a common NT kernel and common WinRT APIs.

This is part of the reason I think that Windows Phone 8 was a huge gamble (and explains the late SDK, reluctance to show off publicly, and mad dash to RTM internally).

Think about it...Windows Phone 8 was being developed in parallel with Windows 8. That's never been a recipe for success.

Imagine trying to keep two monumental code bases in sync, both which are rapidly changing.

Reply Parent Score: 2