Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Oct 2012 18:15 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Ubuntu 12.10 has been released, sporting the rather... Interesting tagline 'Avoid the pain of Windows 8'. Two main features are that websites can now be treated as actual applications, integrating them into Unity. The divide between local and online content when searching has also been softened, which, they claim, makes it easier to find what you're looking for. On the server side, it includes the Folsom release of OpenStack, "Cinder, for block storage and Quantum, a virtual networking API. Ubuntu's Metal-as-a-Service bare-metal provisioning tool has been updated and now supports Calxeda hyperscale hardware based on ARM".
Thread beginning with comment 539017
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: ...
by lucas_maximus on Thu 18th Oct 2012 18:51 UTC in reply to "..."
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

The wireless won't work

:trollface:

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by Hiev on Thu 18th Oct 2012 18:56 in reply to "RE: ..."
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

As a matter of fact it works, cause I have the same laptop right now but is not mine, It is from the place I work and wireless works good.

Let me tell you one think, if you want a Linux friendly laptop, buy a Samsung.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by lucas_maximus on Thu 18th Oct 2012 19:07 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I normally make sure it has a intel chipset and is either lenovo or dell business.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: ...
by darknexus on Thu 18th Oct 2012 18:57 in reply to "RE: ..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

The wireless won't work

:trollface:

Aww, you beat me to it. ;) I was going to say sure, avoid the pain of Windows 8 and experience a whole new level of pain you will never forget. Although, truth be told, Wi-Fi isn't really the main problem with Linux these days. Audio and video, as well as external device connectivity (scanners, etc) are where the real pains are. If your device works, great. If it doesn't work, you're fcuked.

Reply Parent Score: 1

v RE[3]: ...
by lucas_maximus on Thu 18th Oct 2012 19:08 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
RE[3]: ...
by leech on Thu 18th Oct 2012 19:11 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

"The wireless won't work

:trollface:

Aww, you beat me to it. ;) I was going to say sure, avoid the pain of Windows 8 and experience a whole new level of pain you will never forget. Although, truth be told, Wi-Fi isn't really the main problem with Linux these days. Audio and video, as well as external device connectivity (scanners, etc) are where the real pains are. If your device works, great. If it doesn't work, you're fcuked.
"

Yeah, but then again the same can be said for Windows XP and Vista these days. Windows drops support for hardware far quicker than Linux does. The problem is if Linux doesn't have support from the hardware manufacturer at all and no Linux developers have the device to engineer drivers themselves.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: ...
by aliquis on Fri 19th Oct 2012 05:52 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

"But if you don't like it you can always fix it yourself!" ..

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by lemur2 on Fri 19th Oct 2012 12:43 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"The wireless won't work

:trollface:

Aww, you beat me to it. ;) I was going to say sure, avoid the pain of Windows 8 and experience a whole new level of pain you will never forget. Although, truth be told, Wi-Fi isn't really the main problem with Linux these days. Audio and video, as well as external device connectivity (scanners, etc) are where the real pains are. If your device works, great. If it doesn't work, you're fcuked.
"

All one has to do is find a machine for which the supplier is prepared to pre-install Linux. It will then be a machine which will run Linux.

For example, here is the ordering page for the machine on which I am typing this very message (running 64-bit Kubuntu 12.10):
http://www.pioneercomputers.com.au/products/configure.asp?c1=3&c2=1...

Scroll down the page to where you see the heading "Microsoft Windows", and ensure that no box under that heading is checked. Underneath that, under the next heading "Operating System Options", check ONLY the box "Ubuntu Linux OS Pre-loaded".

This is what I did. It saved me $117 over the recommended OS, which was "Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium (32/64 Bit) [+$117]". I also ensured that no other software, such as Microsoft Office 2010 Home and Business Edition [+$253], was selected, as that would be software for the recommended OS only.

All up I got the machine for the base price of $449, and I saved $370 by selecting no Microsoft software or OS, yet I ended up with a (Linux desktop) system every bit as capable, and I was assured that it was guaranteed to be able to run Linux flawlessly.

BTW, have you seen Kubuntu 12.10? Fantastic OS, it works flawlessly on my machine (as you would expect), it is as fast as blazes, and it has a vast array of excellent desktop software available at zero cost installable in next-to-no-time at the click of a button. External device connectivity (scanners, printers etc) is also flawless.

If your time is worth anything, go for such a Kubuntu option. You will save heaps of time and effort. You also get superb value for money. The total system (hardware + software) is half that of a Windows 7 + recommended desktop software option on the exact same hardware. This is easily the best way I know of to "avoid the pain of Windows 8 and experience a whole new level of pain".

Edited 2012-10-19 12:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ...
by Lorin on Fri 19th Oct 2012 01:34 in reply to "RE: ..."
Lorin Member since:
2010-04-06

Mine does with Ubuntu, Mint and Debian. Samsung is fairly linux friendly

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by cmost on Sat 20th Oct 2012 21:30 in reply to "RE: ..."
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

I get tired of Windows weenies dabbling with Linux and then concluding after half an hour that this that or the other didn't work so therefore Linux is crap. No, your hardware is probably crap or your knowledge of Linux is severely lacking. As a long-time Linux user (10 years now) I have learned that you do your homework before you purchase such things as new laptops, printers, scanners, motherboards, video cards and the like. It takes all of about a half hour on Google to figure out what is well supported and what isn't. Then, you simply buy accordingly saving yourself hours upon hours of headaches trying to force a square peg into a round hole and then blaming the innocent party when it doesn't work. Hardware manufactures don't write drivers for Linux and they disclose little about the inner-workings of their devices. Therefore an army of coders working for free has to reverse engineer these drivers. In my opinion, since most things simply work right out of the box, I have to conclude that these folks are doing a fabulous job! If you want to blame someone, blame the hardware vendors who don't document their devices well or support Linux in any way shape or form.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: ...
by Ninjawidget on Sat 20th Oct 2012 22:26 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Ninjawidget Member since:
2011-08-18

Why should anyone support something that only a very small minority use? Lets see, linux 1% share, Windows 90% share. Now I was a major Linux advocate and user for nearly ten years myself, but due to the FreeTards expecting me to give up all my time to fix their crap for nothing and not even getting any thanks I decided to go back to Windows development last month. I'm upgrading to Windows 8 because it works great out of the box, no drivers were needed, but they are on the vendors sites if I need them, and I've found people are actually paying me for my coding skills, rather than having to work a second job just so I can fix bugs in the Linux Kernel, which I stopped supporting due to the direction things are going.

I won't be porting my apps to Linux. The market is too small for me to be bothered with, plus the headaches are more in Linux Land due to the Tards unable to read my install instructions which are so easy btw my 7 yr old niece can follow them.

I've already had lots of abuse on my site because of my change of OS, and so I am in the middle of selling that site, and setting up my new Windows only Blog/site.

What can I say. Linux really is useful for servers, but as I am launching Windows server based apps then Linux is of no use to me at all nowadays, and it won't get any better, its marketshare will remain low for the next ten years at least.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by Dave_K on Sat 20th Oct 2012 23:02 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

I get tired of Windows weenies dabbling with Linux and then concluding after half an hour that this that or the other didn't work so therefore Linux is crap.


If Linux fanboys didn't whitewash its problems then maybe people wouldn't have false expectations.

No, your hardware is probably crap or your knowledge of Linux is severely lacking. As a long-time Linux user (10 years now) I have learned that you do your homework before you purchase such things as new laptops, printers, scanners, motherboards, video cards and the like.


It's nowhere near as easy as that for two reasons:

1. Something that works in one distribution may not work in another, or even in a different version of it. I've bought hardware after finding guides to using it with Debian and still had no luck in Linux Mint. My Thinkpad, which works pretty well with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, doesn't have working power management in either Fedora or Ubuntu. Even if the hardware itself works, it's often the case that graphical configuration tools are only available for certain distributions, and then aren't updated to work with newer ones.

2. When Linux compatibility guides state that a particular piece of hardware works in Linux, they don't necessarily mean that every feature of it works perfectly. For example, I've seen soundcards listed as compatible as soon as stereo output works, which isn't much use if I want to record using the optical input. I've been called a nitpicker for complaining that my "Linux compatible" laptop's special buttons and sleep mode didn't work. The fact that Linux installed and booted to the desktop was enough for it to be considered fully compatible, with no problems worth listing.

Using Windows it really is as simple as checking that the hardware has drivers for the version I'm running. With Linux, researching compatibility often turns up a lot of misleading and incomplete information, with problems only revealed after actually trying the hardware. I'd rather save myself the time and hassle of dealing with that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by emrehliug on Sat 20th Oct 2012 23:13 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
emrehliug Member since:
2009-12-27

I myself am a long time Linux user. Never did I do any homework before buying new hardware. Probably I was lucky but always all my hardware worked, even wireless printers and dual video cards setups. That is not to say I did not encounter problems: I did, several. Still, as a rule I found it easier and more pleasant to deal with those Linux problems than I do dealing with Windows' problems. Perhaps Linux lacks a company or a group of people to do for a single distribution what I do for my personal use. You see, linux works, period. In too many cases better than Windows. Hardware support in Linux is close to a non-issue to me; at least no more than Windows. I repeat: one company or group should focus effort in doing it easier for users and the tech people alike to solve driver/software problems; as it stands now, it is perceivably (but in reality, for those who know their way around both OSs, it is the same) more diffilcult to solve such problems in Linux than in Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: ...
by lucas_maximus on Sun 21st Oct 2012 17:00 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I get tired of Windows weenies dabbling with Linux and then concluding after half an hour that this that or the other didn't work so therefore Linux is crap. No, your hardware is probably crap or your knowledge of Linux is severely lacking.


Neither, I am proficient using Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris.

As a long-time Linux user (10 years now) I have learned that you do your homework before you purchase such things as new laptops, printers, scanners, motherboards, video cards and the like. It takes all of about a half hour on Google to figure out what is well supported and what isn't. Then, you simply buy accordingly saving yourself hours upon hours of headaches trying to force a square peg into a round hole and then blaming the innocent party when it doesn't work. Hardware manufactures don't write drivers for Linux and they disclose little about the inner-workings of their devices. Therefore an army of coders working for free has to reverse engineer these drivers. In my opinion, since most things simply work right out of the box, I have to conclude that these folks are doing a fabulous job! If you want to blame someone, blame the hardware vendors who don't document their devices well or support Linux in any way shape or form.


I do this for Windows to so I don't get a crap experience.

Linux still fails short if I buy intel chipsets (usually the best support), realtek sound (usually the best supported and nvidia (their drivers on *nix are the only ones that have decent 3d support).

And something still breaks between distro releases.

Reply Parent Score: 1