Linked by cloud on Sat 27th Oct 2012 01:05 UTC
Linux A new version of the real-time Linux scheduler called SCHED_DEADLINE has been released on the Linux Kernel Mailing List. For people who missed previous submissions, it consists of a new deadline-based CPU scheduler for the Linux kernel with bandwidth isolation (resource reservation) capabilities. It supports global/clustered multiprocessor scheduling through dynamic task migrations. This new version takes into account previous comments/suggestions and is aligned to the latest mainline kernel. A video about SCHED_DEADLINE is also available on YouTube.
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RE[3]: lie-nux at it again.
by WereCatf on Sat 27th Oct 2012 12:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: lie-nux at it again."
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

For some reason I do not believe a thing you're saying.

even though i use mint linux executing off a usb drive... linux is simply a badly written program with big claims. it is too complicated ( libraries, many commands, slow, crashy... ).


A badly written program with many commands and libraries? If you were an OS-developer you'd know the difference between a kernel and userland.

Reply Parent Score: 7

v RE[4]: lie-nux at it again.
by sameer on Sat 27th Oct 2012 12:23 in reply to "RE[3]: lie-nux at it again."
RE[5]: lie-nux at it again.
by WereCatf on Sat 27th Oct 2012 12:30 in reply to "RE[4]: lie-nux at it again."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

you have answered your own doubts.


You're not making any sense here.

the good os is simple in architecture


No, a good OS is one that fits its intended purpose. There is no single definition of a "good os."

by architecture linux is not microkernel.


And? No one claimed it was.

so this talk about "user-land" is shouting out that in linux there is not natural separation between kernel and "what ever one might call it".


Oh, really? Why are there so many different operating systems which use Linux-kernel but an entirely different userland? Oh, that's right: you have no idea what you're talking about.

don't forget the aspect of these complicated "dependencies" when one has to "install" some program.

what happened to the unix method of copy some program to a directory and just use it ??


Ahahaha. Fail. Next time learn what you're talking about.

Edited 2012-10-27 12:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: lie-nux at it again.
by Laurence on Sat 27th Oct 2012 19:43 in reply to "RE[4]: lie-nux at it again."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


what happened to the unix method of copy some program to a directory and just use it ??

That method never existed. Even in the old days programs had to be compiled for each Unix variant and architecture, and these days UNIX dependencies are almost as bad as Linux.

Even on Windows, so called "stand alone" applications have pre-requisites, be that a specific version of the .NET framework, the latest DirectX drivers or even just Win32 libraries.

i have 512 megabyte in my desktop ( mint linux ). i have to restart most days. it just hangs.

Have you never considered that your problem might be running one of the most resource heavy distributions of Linux on a 10 year old PC?

You'd be better off with Puppy than Mint.

i know about computing... i built the first control program ( os ) of south asia, in 2002. it was based on microkernel architecture but ran in x86 "real mode". just a demonstrator. had message passing and unix-like "signals".

Please don't insult our intelligence with such blatant lies. If you want to appear to understand this subject, then you're much better off learning the subject (and keeping quiet on the subject until you do) rather than pretending to then covering your tracks with fictitious boasts because everyone has voted you down for posting nonsense.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[5]: lie-nux at it again.
by Soulbender on Sun 28th Oct 2012 02:25 in reply to "RE[4]: lie-nux at it again."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

the good os is simple in architecture, which makes it reliable and easy to add to ( modules ) or remove.


You're confusing your own opinion with facts.

so this talk about "user-land" is shouting out that in linux there is not natural separation between kernel and "what ever one might call it"


Say what? The fact that one is kernel space and the other is user land says exactly that: that there is a separation.

i have 512 megabyte in my desktop ( mint linux ). i have to restart most days. it just hangs.


It's not 2002 anymore, use the right tool for the job. Mint is obviously not the right choice for such a resource starved system.

i only use mint linux because the windows xp machine was not allowing me to access the win-xp boot partition.


How is this relevant? What does it even mean?

don't forget the aspect of these complicated "dependencies" when one has to "install" some program.


It's 2012, we have reliable tools to handle these tings now.

what happened to the unix method of copy some program to a directory and just use it ??


I think you're confusing Unix and DOS.

Reply Parent Score: 4