Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 26th Oct 2012 21:31 UTC, submitted by robertson
General Development "This website is here to guide you through the process of developing very basic operating systems on the Raspberry Pi! This website is aimed at people aged 16 and upwards, although younger readers may still find some of it accessible, particularly with assistance. More lessons may be added to this course in time." From the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, one of the institutions behind the Raspberry Pi. Amazing resource.
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RE: Aged 16 and upwards?
by satsujinka on Sat 27th Oct 2012 14:52 UTC in reply to "Aged 16 and upwards?"
satsujinka
Member since:
2010-03-11

That's great for you, but the vast majority aren't in your shoes. Being personally familiar with it, the American school system fails completely at teaching anything even slightly complicated. For example, even though I was put on a "fast track" for math I was never presented with the math to do 3D work. My highschool didn't even offer linear algebra! I probably could have done the electronics courses in high school to learn to design circuits, but that option certainly wasn't available before that, meaning at best the school system started offering this kind of stuff at 14 or 15 (at 8 they were still trying to teach multiplication!)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Aged 16 and upwards?
by viton on Sun 28th Oct 2012 15:42 in reply to "RE: Aged 16 and upwards?"
viton Member since:
2005-08-09

That's great for you, but the vast majority aren't in your shoes. Being personally familiar with it, the American school system fails completely at teaching anything even slightly complicated.

You're asking too much from education system. If you want to learn something, nobody can stop you (except religion issues). At 16 a lot of my friends were fluent asm coders.

For example, even though I was put on a "fast track" for math I was never presented with the math to do 3D work.
The base "math to do 3D work" could be learned in a several days.
Why didn't you tried to open a book at least?

Edited 2012-10-28 15:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Aged 16 and upwards?
by Alfman on Sun 28th Oct 2012 18:01 in reply to "RE[2]: Aged 16 and upwards?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

viton,

"You're asking too much from education system. If you want to learn something, nobody can stop you (except religion issues). At 16 a lot of my friends were fluent asm coders."

I was too, but times are changing. I think there's a lot schools could do to improve education, but most districts here are suffering from spending cuts that have occurred throughout this decade.

Then there's the spread of personal computers like ipads which cannot be programmed directly like the computers they're replacing. Many families still have access to unrestricted computers, but I worry that alot fewer will have access to them in the future going by today's trends.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Aged 16 and upwards?
by satsujinka on Sun 28th Oct 2012 23:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Aged 16 and upwards?"
satsujinka Member since:
2010-03-11

How is it too much to ask the education system to educate people?

Of course, the bigger issue is that the school system makes everything boring. If people are discouraged (as I was) then there's no inclination to "open a book" to learn more. Nor does it help that the education system doesn't even point people in the right direction. It doesn't matter if a subset of linear algebra can be learned in a day, if you don't know that that's what you need to know.

Reply Parent Score: 2