Linked by cloud on Sat 27th Oct 2012 01:05 UTC
Linux A new version of the real-time Linux scheduler called SCHED_DEADLINE has been released on the Linux Kernel Mailing List. For people who missed previous submissions, it consists of a new deadline-based CPU scheduler for the Linux kernel with bandwidth isolation (resource reservation) capabilities. It supports global/clustered multiprocessor scheduling through dynamic task migrations. This new version takes into account previous comments/suggestions and is aligned to the latest mainline kernel. A video about SCHED_DEADLINE is also available on YouTube.
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RE[5]: lie-nux at it again.
by jessesmith on Sat 27th Oct 2012 21:08 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: lie-nux at it again."
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

That just takes care of one tool which can bring the system to its knees, limiting access to dd is a bandage. The issue is that any application on Linux can cause the system a great deal of stress or bring it down. (I do this a couple of times a year by accident.)

There are ways to protect against this kind of attack (accidental or not) such as setting resource limits on user accounts. Most distributions do not appear to ship with these in place by default, but if your system requires lots of uninterrupted uptime, the sysadmin should consider locking down resource usage.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: lie-nux at it again.
by Laurence on Sat 27th Oct 2012 21:35 in reply to "RE[5]: lie-nux at it again."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

That just takes care of one tool which can bring the system to its knees, limiting access to dd is a bandage. The issue is that any application on Linux can cause the system a great deal of stress or bring it down. (I do this a couple of times a year by accident.)

There are ways to protect against this kind of attack (accidental or not) such as setting resource limits on user accounts. Most distributions do not appear to ship with these in place by default, but if your system requires lots of uninterrupted uptime, the sysadmin should consider locking down resource usage.

It the same case for all OSs though. Trying to open a 200MB Excel spreadsheet that some office idiot decided to build a database in will easily bring Windows to it's knees.

The moment you put an idiot in front a computer than that machine is as good as dead. Regardless of the OS. There's a saying that goes something like "The more you dumb something down, the bigger idiot that come along".

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[6]: lie-nux at it again.
by Alfman on Sat 27th Oct 2012 21:37 in reply to "RE[5]: lie-nux at it again."
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

jessesmith,

"The issue is that any application on Linux can cause the system a great deal of stress or bring it down. "

Agree with your post, however let's expand that to ANY multiuser OS, be it UNIX (freebsd, linux, osx, etc), windows terminal server, citrix, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: lie-nux at it again.
by foregam on Sun 28th Oct 2012 18:53 in reply to "RE[5]: lie-nux at it again."
foregam Member since:
2010-11-17

man sh
Scroll down to ulimit and read about all things you can put limits on. dd is not a problem by itself.

Reply Parent Score: 4