Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 29th Oct 2012 18:14 UTC
Google While Microsoft is unveiling all about Windows Phone 8, Google ruined the party a little bit by 'leaking' all about Android 4.2, the Nexus 10 tablet, and the new Nexus phone, the LG Nexus 4. There's some pretty awesome stuff in here from Google - except for the fact the devices themselves are kind of ugly.
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RE: Nexus 4
by saso on Wed 31st Oct 2012 14:21 UTC in reply to "Nexus 4"
saso
Member since:
2007-04-18

Sorry for being a bit sarcastic, but I couldn't resist.

NO LTE

LTE is a US-specific thing. Most of the world doesn't care.

NO 32 GIG VERSION
NO SD CARD SLOT

Valid criticisms.

NO removable battery

Again, nobody cares. We've moved on.

NO real reason to upgrade

Subjective opinion. Looking through the rest of your comment you make the awful impression of being a whiny kid who needs to have the latest and greatest shiny that is available on the market immediately when it's released. Perhaps the Nexus 4 isn't reason enough to upgrade for Galaxy Nexus owners, but being a 1st gen Nexus user myself, I can certainly see the appeal in the Nexus 4 (that's barely a 3 year old phone, mind you).

Hey Google, 2010 called and wants its smartphone back.

The quad-core CPU, 2 gigs of RAM and huge screen certainly aren't features from 2010, but it's easy to forget if you're only looking for spec-superiority in new products.

And while Google is making excuses about why an LTE phone is so impractical:
http://www.theverge.com/2012/10/29/3569688/why-nexus-4-does-not-hav...

Way to dismiss a valid argument out of hand.

Apple just released an LTE phone in the US on all major carriers.

An Apple phone is also a lot more expensive. Oh and it also has no replaceable battery or SD card slot, but somehow it's only bad when Google does it.

So now Google customers are stuck between buying this piece of shit or having to choose a phone that is violated by the carriers and will take 6-8 months to get updates.

Mind you, that's a piece of shit which can only, per HSPA+ spec, get up to 168Mbit/s downlink and 22Mbit/s uplink speeds. I'm sure that is something worth crying over while you watch your 2GB data cap disappear in under 2 minutes (at 20Mbit/s, regular HSPA+ speeds, you'll drain that in under 14 minutes).

If Apple can manage to work with carriers and get us LTE with timely updates, why can't Google? I don't like iOS at all and would rather tongue the sweaty asshole of a Kenyan marathon runner than own an iPhone, but sometimes being an Android user is goddamn frustrating.

The magnitude of your whining is somewhat astonishing, plus you're crying on the wrong shoulder. You shouldn't be crying over not being able to push hundreds of megabits per second through your mobile device, but rather complain to the carriers for capping your data usage at ridiculously low values or imposing crazy a FUP after some transferred amount.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus 4
by Johann Chua on Wed 31st Oct 2012 15:17 in reply to "RE: Nexus 4"
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Sorry for being a bit sarcastic, but I couldn't resist.

"NO LTE

LTE is a US-specific thing. Most of the world doesn't care.

"

Globe and Smart are rolling out LTE in the Philippines.

Isn't the real problem that there are multiple incompatible LTE standards? You'd have to make separate models for each version.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Nexus 4
by saso on Thu 1st Nov 2012 10:56 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus 4"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

Isn't the real problem that there are multiple incompatible LTE standards? You'd have to make separate models for each version.

In a sense. The incompatibility seems to stem from the fact that LTE uses wildly different frequency bands. According to Wikipedia it's at least the following:

* North America: 700/800/1700/1900 MHz
* South America: 2500 MHz
* Europe: 800/900/1800/2600 MHz
* Asia: 1800/2600 MHz
* Australia: 1800 MHz

So in total it appears there are 8 bands with wavelengths from 11.538cm to 42.857cm. In practice this means you'll need more than one antenna to get good reception on all bands (if you aren't familiar with electrical engineering, you can view an antenna like the string of a violin and the electromagnetic waves it receives like a bow - naturally a certain length string wants to resonate only at a certain frequency); probably three antennas, as the wavelengths seem clustered around 3 values: 37.5cm (700/800/900 MHz), 16.6cm (1700/1800/1900 MHz) and 12cm (2500/2600 MHz). Perhaps some bright engineer might be able to combine these into a single one, as the wavelengths appear close enough for some harmonic resonance to kick in (16.6 * 2 = 33.2, 12 * 3 = 36).

Next come the filters, amplifiers and dipoles. Much of this can be done digitally nowadays, but there's nothing like a good analog preamp to make sure you have good signal clarity. In any case, these are miniature in modern ICs, so adding a bunch more isn't going to hurt manufacturing terribly (after all, pentaband phones are common nowadays and don't seem to suffer terribly inflated costs due to their radios).

The real kicker, though, is testing and certification. While LTE is a standard, knowing the companies implementing base station equipment, it's often a hit-or-miss success story with compatibility, especially as the standards get more complex. LTE is enormously complex and very young, so equipment hasn't yet had the time to mature, so there might be serious issues here that need to be ironed out. Obviously, when you're planning on selling an unsubsidized phone without carrier cooperation, you want it to be as safe on the compatibility side as possible. This, probably, more than anything, forced Google to abandon LTE and go instead for the tried and true UMTS standard.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus 4
by quackalist on Wed 31st Oct 2012 17:54 in reply to "RE: Nexus 4"
quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

Yeah, I've never understand the appeal of mobile devices that run like the wind only to be forced to piffle out after a few minutes use. Why bother, why spend a small fortune...can't get my head around it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus 4
by Alfman on Wed 31st Oct 2012 18:48 in reply to "RE: Nexus 4"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

saso,


WorknMan: "NO removable battery"

saso: "Again, nobody cares. We've moved on."

That's not true at all, electronic waste is a major problem and it's exacerbated when manufactures engineer non-user serviceable devices.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Nexus 4
by saso on Thu 1st Nov 2012 11:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus 4"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

That's not true at all, electronic waste is a major problem and it's exacerbated when manufactures engineer non-user serviceable devices.

I'm not talking about the environmental aspect. I agree with you that we are generating lots of waste, but the fact that batteries aren't replaceable doesn't really factor into people's decision to buy a phone anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 2